Below information is research in progress and provided by

Brian Picton Swann

Francis Green MSS

Bowen, Whitechurch in Kemes, Vol. D, p. 330

Bowen [Trelech], Vol. D, p. 315

Bowen, Pembroke, Vol. 17, p. 610

Picton, Eglwyswrw, Vol. 27, p. 22

Picton, Nevern, Vol. 27, p. 21

Picton, Poyston, Vol. 18, p. 88; Vol. 21, pp. 437‑8; Vol. 22, p. 453

 

OWEN AND COLBY.  Estate and family records of Owen of Orielton and Colby of Ffynone; deeds, mainly 16th-19th century, predominately Co. Pembroke and Anglesey; correspondence, 1679-1897; Pembrokeshire militia papers, 1778-1805 when Lt.-Col. John Colby commanded it, including papers relating to the militia’s tour of duty in Ireland, 1799-1800.  It includes muster rolls, letters, orders, orderly books, circulars, etc., and papers relatin to John Colby’s Court-Martial in 1800.  Deeds, accounts and estate and family letters, 1786-1823, relating to the Orielton Estate in Pembrokeshire and Anglesey, following the appointment of John Colby as receiver of the estate as a result of a legal dispute between members of the Owen family over the administration of the estate during the minority of Sir Hugh Owen.

See also ORIELTON and SPENCE-COLBY.  Schedule (1954+suppl.), 221+1p. Annual Report 1948-49, p.58; 1965-66, p.52. National Library of Wales Journal, 9 (1955-6) pp.106-108.

 


PICTON OF WHITECHURCH and TRELECH

 

Introduction

 

In order to supplement the information available from the usual sources for Family History, such as wills, parish registers and census returns, it is frequently necessary to trace the land records relevant to where your ancestors lived.  This becomes increasingly true before July 1837, the date when civil registration began in England and Wales.  Never is this strategy likely to prove more important than with the various Picton Families of North Pembrokeshire.  This area has been fortunate to have had a number of distinguished historians and genealogists, who from 1580 onwards have taken an interest in its history.  It has also been exceptionally fortunate in the survival of an extensive documentary archive.  One of the great document collections in Wales, which makes the tracing of Picton ancestry feasible back from 1837 to early times in North Pembrokeshire, is the Bronwydd Manuscripts collection at the National Library of Wales (NLW).  Before this time, there survives in the National Archives [TNA] in Class E 210 at Kew [Calendar of Ancient Deeds] a collection of deeds which used to belong to Sir John Perrot [d. 1592].  He had an ancestor [his great-great-grandfather, also a Thomas Perrot] who married Alice Picton, daughter and sole heiress of John Picton, Esq., of Carew.  Sir John Perrot’s estates were confiscated when he was declared guilty of high treason, but he died in the Tower of London before he could be executed.

 

The Bronwydd Manuscripts

 

This vast collection was acquired by the NLW at Aberystwyth in two main sections.  The first deposit was made in 1933 by Sir Marteine Lloyd, Bt. (1851-1933) of Bronwydd in Cardiganshire, just before his death, and by his wife, Katharine Helena, Lady Lloyd [NLW Journal, Volume III, pp. 33-35].  This was followed by a further large deposit in 1941 by their elder daughter, Nesta Withington (d. 1943) [B. G. Charles, The Bronwydd Manuscripts and Records, Group II, NLW Journal, Volume VII, 1951, pp. 67-69; see also B. G. Charles, NLW Journal, Volume IV, 1946, p. 83 and B. G. Charles, The Second Book of George Owen’s Description of Pembrokeshire, NLW Journal, Volume V, 1948, p. 265-285].  These collections are frequently referred to as Bronwydd Group I and Bronwydd Group II.  Bronwydd Group I is also known as NRA 30021 Lloyd (NRA = National Register of Archives).

 

The second Bronwydd deposit consists of nearly 8,000 items, the main bulk being title deeds and allied records dating from the end of the thirteenth century down to the beginning of the twentieth century.  There are land deeds for every parish within the Hundred and Barony of Kemes (Cemais) in North Pembrokeshire, as well as for many other Pembrokeshire parishes.  Manorial Records include an estreat of the Court Rolls of the Barony of Cemais (1621); Court Leet presentments for the Manor of Eglwyswrw (1700); Court Leet presentments for the Barony of Kemes (1771); Court Rolls of the Barony of Cemais (1740-1761); papers relating to the perambulations of the Barony and Commons of the Barony of Cemais (1777-1829); Rentals of Chief Rents and Enclosure Rents of the Barony of Cemais (1775-1888); Chief Rents and Enclosure Rents of the town of Newport (1710-1859) and Rentals of the Bronwydd Estate (1775-1816).

 

To appreciate the origin of this collection it is essential to understand the descent of the Lordship of Cemais (Kemes).  Fortunately an excellent guide has been produced recently by Dillwyn Miles, a gentleman and historian who has spent the majority of his working life, and had a life-long interest, in Newport and the surrounding area, known in former times as Cemais (Kemes) [Dillwyn Miles, The Lords of Cemais, Cemais Publications, Haverfordwest, 1997, 87 pages].  Dillwyn Miles was born in Cemais during the First World War and in 1947 returned to live in Newport Castle.  He has been Senior Alderman of Newport, Mayor of Newport four times, as well as Mayor, Sheriff and Burgess Warden of Haverfordwest.  He was the founder of the Pembrokeshire Historical Society, whose first Volume appeared in 1958 and included an article by Glyn Picton on The Pictons of Poyston.[1]  He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London, has researched and written twelve books, edited another two, and contributed to numerous other publications.  Brian Swann had the pleasure of having lunch with him on 1 June 2004, when he was aged 88.  He provided a direct link between Sir Marteine Lloyd, whom he could remember vividly and whose picture appears at the end of the book, and the present day.

 

The Lords and Lordship of Cemais

 

The best short recent account is the book by Dillwyn Miles, The Lords of Cemais, Cemais Publications, Haverfordwest, 1997, 87 pages.  Also recently published is the book by Leslie Baker-Jones, The Wolf and the Boar: The Lloyds of Bronwydd, Cardiganshire - Lords Marcher of Cemais, 2005, pp [Leslie Baker-Jones, Quatrefris Books, Danygribin House, Velindre, Llandyssul  SA44 5HR; Tel: 01559 370999].

 

The series of Volumes published by the Pembrokeshire Historical Society are also exceptionally useful.  Pembrokeshire County History, Volume II, 2002, covers Medieval Pembrokeshire, down to about 1535.  Pembrokeshire County History, Volume III, 1987, covers Early Modern Pembrokeshire, 1536-1815.  Pembrokeshire County History, Volume IV, 1993, covers Modern Pembrokeshire, 1815-1974.  The Titles of the Sections of these three books are given here to illustrate the depth of coverage.  Volume II is particularly useful for the early settlement and wars which swept across Wales up to the final Welsh rebellion by Llewellyn the Great in the early 1400s, leading to the Act of Union of 1536.

 

Medieval Pembrokeshire

 

Chapter I                            Conquest and Survival by I. W. Rowlands

Chapter II                            The Earls of Pembroke, 1138-1379 by R. F. Walker

Chapter III                            The Lordships of Pembrokeshire in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries by R. F. Walker

Chapter IV                            Unrest and Rebellion, 1389-1415 by R. K. Turvey

Chapter V                            The Extension of Royal Power, 1415-1536 by R. A. Griffiths

Chapter VI                            The Bishops of St. David’s from Bernard to Bec by H. Wyn Evans

Chapter VII                            The Church, 1280-1534 by Glanmor Williams

Chapter VIII                            The Regular Clergy, 1093-1540 by F. A. Cowley

Chapter IX                            The Gentry by R. K. Turvey

Chapter X                            The Countryside by John Howells

Chapter XI                            The Boroughs of Medieval Pembrokeshire

                              Introduction by Brian Howells

                              Haverford, by T. A. James

                              Newport, by Dillwyn Miles

                              Pembroke, by John Howells

                              Tenby, by R. F. Walker

Chapter XII                            The Welsh Literary Tradition by Dillwyn Miles

Chapter XIII                            The Castles of Pembrokeshire by David King and John Kenyon

Chapter XIV                            Medieval Domestic Architecture in Pembrokeshire by Tony Parkinson

Chapter XV                            Medieval Church Building in Pembrokeshire by Robert Scourfield

 

Early Modern Pembrokeshire, 1536-1815

 

Chapter I                            Land and People, 1536-1642 by Brian Howells

Chapter II                            Society, 1536-1642 by Brian Howells

Chapter III                            The Economy, 1536-1642 by Brian Howells

Chapter IV                            Religious Change, 1536-1642 by David Walker

Chapter V                            Government and Politics, 1536-1642 by Brian Howells

Chapter VI                            The First Civil War by Roland Mathias

Chapter VII                            The Second Civil War and Interregnum by Roland Mathias

Chapter VIII                            Religion and Education, 1660-1815 by Richard Brinkley

Chapter IX                            Society, 1660-1793 by David Howell

Chapter X                            The Economy, 1660-1793 by David Howell

                              Appendix 1: Incomes of large landowners around 1700.

                              Appendix 2: Family fortunes in South-west Wales between 1702 and 1760.

Chapter XI                            The Political Scene, 1660-1815 by Roland Thorne

Chapter XII                            Pembrokeshire in Wartime, 1793-1815 by Roland Thorne and Robert Howell

 

Modern Pembrokeshire, 1815-1974

 

Chapter I                            The Land and its People, 1815-1974 by Muriel Bowen Evans

Chapter II                            The Towns of Pembrokeshire, 1815-1974 by Roy Lewis

Chapter III                            Farming in Pembrokeshire, 1815-1974 by David W. Howell

Chapter IV                            The Pembrokeshire Coal Industry by M. R. Connop Price

Chapter V                            The Pembrokeshire Slate Industry by Dafydd Roberts

Chapter VI                            Pembroke Dockyard by Lawrence Phillips

Chapter VII                            The Port of Milford: The Fishing Industry by Ken McKay

Chapter VIII                            The Port of Milford: Oil in the Twentieth Century by Ken McKay

Chapter IX                            The Tourist Industry by Dillwyn Miles

Chapter X                            The Pembrokeshire Islands by Roscoe Howells

Chapter XI                            Pembrokeshire and National Politics, 1815-1974 by Roland Thorne

Chapter XII                            Local Government, 1815-1974 by D. Leslie Baker-Jones

Chapter XIII                            Crime and Protest, 1815-1974 by Audrey Philpin

Chapter XIV                            Naval Activity by Ted Goddard

Chapter XV                            Pembrokeshire Soldiery by Vernon Scott

Chapter XVI                            Military Aviation by John Evans

Chapter XVII                            Religion, 1815-1974 by Richard Brinkley

Chapter XVIII                            Education, 1815-1974 by Gareth Elwyn Jones

Chapter XIX                            Leisure and Recreation, 1815-1974 by David W. Howell

 

The Landscape and Settlement in Cemais

 

In the less-fertile land of Cemaes, the Prescelli hills area, persistent Welsh tenure led, in contrast to other parts of Pembrokeshire, to a very dispersed settlement pattern of small, non-nuclear farms, and while much of the landscape was unenclosed until the post-medieval period this was largely due to it being moor and waste.  Concentrations of population were few.  However, the Anglo-Norman Borough of Newport was like St David’s, a planted Anglo-Norman foundation of the late 12th-century, with formal burgages, a market and a fair.  The Manor of Nevern, and the Manor or sub-Lordship of Eglwyswrw in the eastern part of Cemais, both operated a developed Manorial system, while Eglwyswrw possessed its own Manorial Court [Owen 1897].  There are also suggestions that Eglwyswrw village was an early nucleation.  The settlement at Nevern itself was variously referred to by George Owen as a Manor, Vill or Borough, and around 1600 he described Newport and Nevern as the 'Two Ancient Boroughs of Cemais', with 28 burgages at the former and 18 at the latter [Owen, 1897, p. 477].  However, Nevern was never a formal Borough, and did not possess a Corporation, nor other urban infrastructure.

 

Even within the Manors of Eglwyswrw and Nevern large elements of Welsh tenurial custom were retained, leading to the development of a number of small landholdings; within each of which developed a gentry house of varying status.  Within Eglwyswrw these numbered at least 15 by the 16th century [Jones, 1996].  Recent work by Sambrook has identified a possible underlying settlement pattern here, with seven potential settlement foci, perhaps corresponding to Jones’ model of an early 'multiple estate' [Sambrook, 2000].  Other, small, nucleations within the Prescelli area, such as Brynberian, Felindre Farchog, Llangolman and Mynachlogddu, all appear to be post-medieval in origin established on settlement foci represented by mills and pre-existing churches, while Rosebush was established in the 1870s to serve the nearby slate-quarry.

 

The Prescelli area of North Pembrokeshire was, during the early post-medieval period at least, one of the main centres of woollen production in Pembrokeshire, with at least six recognisable 16th century fulling mill sites [E. T. Lewis, North of the Hills, A History of the Parishes of Eglwyswen, Eglwyswrw, Llanfair Nantgwyn, Meline and Nevern, Haverfordwest, 1972], and several 19th century factories including those of Felindre Farchog, which boasted both a woollen mill and a tannery, and Brynberian.  The establishment of these factories led to the development of small nucleations, and some, such as Pontyglasier, continued production into the 20th century.

 

By the 1830s, the woollen industry in Prescelli had been superseded by that of the St David’s area and the largest return for any one district was seventeen for the neighbourhood of St David’s itself, including that at Middle Mill, which now operates as a tourist attraction.  However, the economy of the area remained overwhelmingly agricultural, and other industry was restricted mainly to extraction and burning for both lime and culm.  Many quarries were established along the coast during the post-medieval period, while the batteries of limekilns, at for example Porth Clais, form a significant component of the harbour landscape.  Quarrying for building stone has historically also been undertaken along the southern coast, in particular the fine-grained sandstone quarried around Caer Bwdi which was used in the construction of the west front of St David's Cathedral, as well as in other buildings.

 

Older farm buildings date almost exclusively to the 19th century and are in the main stone-built.  Some earth-built structures are present in the Prescelli area, but these are relatively rare.  In both Preseli and St David's the size and range of farm buildings are relatively small compared with those of south Pembrokeshire and southern Carmarthenshire.  In Preselli it is usual for a farm to consist of one or two ranges of small stone buildings, comprising a cow house, stable, cart shed and barn.  The barns are small.  The size and range of buildings reflect the mixed economy of the farms in the 19th century and the modest size of the land-holdings.  Within the St David's area, and on Skomer and Ramsey Island, farm buildings are larger than those of Prescelli, with ranges, including large barns, attached to more substantial farms.  The semi-formal arrangement of the farmhouse with its range of farm buildings set around a courtyard, as found in other parts of southwest Wales particularly in areas dominated by large estates, is rare in both the St David's and Prescelli areas.

 

To the north of Mynydd Prescelli is a further concentration of ecclesiastical sites which were formerly associated with the large medieval parish of Eglwyswrw.  The church of Eglwyswrw itself, now dedicated to St Cristiolus, appears to occupy an early site and may formerly have been dedicated to the Virgin Mary as was its dependant chapelry, later a parish church, at Llanfair Nant-Gwyn, and a number of wells in the surrounding district [Ludlow, 1998b].  The redundant parish church at Eglwyswen, like Llanfair Nantgwyn a 19th century rebuild, was also a chapelry of Eglwyswrw, but the neighbouring Meline was a medieval parish church under the patronage of the Freemen of the Manor, who had the right of alternate presentation to the living in a particular form of Welsh custom [Ludlow, 1998].  The church, dedicated to St Dogfael who was clearly the dominant cult figure within the area, occupies a circular churchyard and may be early, but was rebuilt in the 19th century, although it retained a late-medieval door surround with human-mask grotesque mouldings.  Much of this northern area lay within the medieval parish of Nevern, from which the closed church at Cilgwyn survives as a much-rebuilt chapel-of-ease.

 

The Nonconformist Chapels of the Parishes

 

The history of the nonconformist movement in Carmarthenshire and Northern Pembrokeshire is intimately bound up with the story of this branch of the Picton family.  Owen Picton was one of the early members of the Chapel at Penygroes in the parish of Whitechurch in Pembrokeshire.  It is essential to have a good map to understand the distances between the various Chapels in the several parishes, which often lie quite close to each other, frequently on the borderline between the two Counties.  Perhaps the first parish to describe in terms of chronology is that of Henllan Chapel in the parish of Henllan Amgoed, Carmarthenshire.

 

Henllan Chapel, in the Parish of Amgoed, Carmarthenshire

 

Nonconformist preaching occurred here before 1650.  The people from the area then worshipped at Pal Mawr in the parish of Kiffig before 1696.  The man occupying that farm died in that year, and part of those who worshipped there moved to the Henllan area of Carmarthenshire, and built a Chapel in 1697 with a graveyard attached.  The Chapel was subsequently rebuilt in 1724, 1777 and 1830.  Many of the subsequent Chapels built in the area were branches of this mother Chapel.  Thomas Morgan was Minister of this Chapel from 1746 to 1760 and he kept notes of all those he baptised during his pastorate there [NLW MS 5460].[2]  Richard Morgan was Minister here from 1769 to 1805.  Baptism registers survive for 1748 to 1837, and burials from 1785 to 1829 [RG 4/2516 and RG 4/3771].  These registers include baptisms for Trinity Chapel in the parish of Llanboidy; Carfan Chapel in the parish of Lampeter Velfry and Bethel Chapel in the parish of Llanddewi Velfry.  The last two Chapels are in Pembrokeshire.

 

Glandŵr Chapel, in the Parish of Llanfyrnach, Pembrokeshire

 

The cause began at Glandŵr in 1708, when there was a disagreement amongst members of Henllan Chapel.[3]  A Chapel was built by 1712, enlarged in 1717 and rebuilt in 1774 and 1836.  Glandŵr Chapel and Rhydyceisiaid Chapel in the parish of Llangynin had the same Minister from 1708 to 1800.  Glandwr prospered under several different Ministers in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.  Several Chapels were organized from this cause.  Records available include a register of baptisms and members, 1746 to 1794 [NLW MS 4759E]; an account book, 1825 to 1831 [NLW MS 15520A]; baptisms and burials, 1785 to 1824 [Class RG 4/3915], also births and baptisms, 1827 to 1837 [RG 4/4077]; a commonplace notebook of John Lloyd James, Clwydwenfro, containing extracts of accounts of this Chapel, 1723 to 1760, and lists of baptisms, 1750 to 1759 [NLW MS 11076A].

 

An album of material also survives dealing with a wide vaiety of material concerning this Chapel and Rhydyceisiaid Chapel, Llangynin, in the County of Pembrokeshire.  It includes letters of dismissals at this Chapel from 1738 to 1833, undated lists of members, both here and at Rhydyceisiaid, and certificates of the registration of deaths, 1844 to 1874 [NLW MS 11614].

 

Samuel Davies [1723-1766] was said to be a native of Cilymaenllwyd, he emigrated to the United States.  A Congregational Minister he won a doctorate, and was later President of Princeton University, New Jersey.  Among his published work, one essay on the Resurrection was translated into Welsh by Morgan Jones, Trelech.  References to his contributions have appeared in many publications.

 

In 1776 Princeton University was officially known as the College of New Jersey. It had been chartered thirty years before by the Governor of the Province in the name of King George II “for the Education of Youth in the Learned Languages and in the Liberal Arts and Sciences”.  The charter was issued to a self-perpetuating board of trustees who were acting in behalf of the evangelical or New Light wing of the Presbyterian Church, but the College had no legal or constitutional identification with that denomination.  Its doors were to be open to all students, “any different sentiments in religion notwithstanding”.  The announced purpose of the founders was to train men who would become “ornaments of the State as well as the Church”.  It was the fourth college to be established in British North America, after Harvard, William and Mary, and Yale, in that order.

The College was originally located in Elizabeth, where its first President, the Revd. Jonathan Dickinson, was also pastor of the town’s Presbyterian church.  When Dickinson died within a few months after the opening of the College in May 1747, the trustees were fortunate in persuading the Revd. Aaron Burr, pastor of the Presbyterian church in Newark, to accept the Presidency.  The College moved to Newark in the fall of 1747, and there in the next year a class of six young men became the first to graduate.

The College Moves to Princeton

In the fall of 1756 President Burr brought the College to Princeton.  One of the largest buildings constructed in colonial America stood ready to receive the students and their tutors.  Built of native stone on land donated by Nathaniel FitzRandolph, and with funds collected partly in Great Britain, it was named Nassau Hall at the suggestion of Governor Jonathan Belcher, a special friend of the College, in testimony of the “Honour we retain, in this remote Part of the Globe, to the immortal Memory” of William III, King of England and Prince of Orange, who was “of the illustrious House of Nassau”.  Until the beginning of the nineteenth century, Nassau Hall housed all the functions of the College.  It also provided an increasingly popular designation for the College itself, perhaps because the institution was so fully identified with the building, perhaps because the official name of the College somehow lacked appeal, as is suggested by the popular usage of Princeton College through many years, before the trustees in 1896 adopted the name of Princeton University.

Revolutionary War years

The President of the College at the time of the Revolution was John Witherspoon, eminent Scottish divine who held the office from 1768 to his death in 1794.  Witherspoon was the only ordained clergyman to sign the Declaration of Independence, and for six years thereafter he was an active and influential member of the Continental Congress.  During the war years he found it difficult, and at times impossible, to keep the College in session.  The graduating class of 1776 had twenty-seven members, the five classes immediately following a grand total of thirty.  For much of the time, Nassau Hall was used as a barracks or hospital by troops, either British or American.  As the Battle of Princeton drew to its close on 3 January 1777, British soldiers attempted a last stand within its walls, but American artillery fire helped persuade them instead to surrender.  Tradition has it that a cannon ball fired by a battery commanded by Alexander Hamilton decapitated a portrait of King George II, leaving the frame intact for later use in hanging a portrait of Washington.  Whatever the fact, the damage done to the building by the war was extensive and costly.

Many inquiries are made by people looking to trace their lineage through the Society's vast archive of 20,000 volumes of manuscript records of American Presbyterian Congregations.  The Society is entirely dependent on volunteers to respond to genealogical inquiries.  To conduct a family name search, one must know the correct name of the family's congregation, as searches are done on the basis of church membership rather than via the names of family members.  Once the Society ascertains they have the records being sought, those inquiring either must continue the search in person or hire private researchers recommended by the church.  Inquiries should be directed to: Genealogical Inquiries, Dept. of History & Record Management Services, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), 425 Lombard Street, Philadelphia, PA 19147-1516.

 

John Griffiths’ School, Glandŵr, 1760-1810

 

The first school in Glandŵr of which any written records have been found was opened and maintained by the Revd. John Griffiths, Minister at the Chapel during the second half oif the eighteenth century.  The history of Glandŵr school in its early years was inextricably bound up with the history of Glandŵr Chapel.  The first Chapel building was erected in 1712, under the ministry of the Revd. Lewis Thomas.  The school met in the Chapel, and eventually, by the end of the century, the name of Glandwr was known throughout Wales because of the inspired teaching and preaching of the Revd. John Griffiths.

 

In his book, Hanes Eglwys Glandwr [The History of Glandwr Church] the Revd. John Lloyd James, known by his Bard name of Clwydwenfro, lists a number of men who had been educated at John Griffiths’ school, and who went on to ordination in the ministry.  One such man was Thomas davies of Llanfyrnach.  After his schooling at Glandwr he kept the school at penygroes started by John Griffiths, for a while.  Another local man who made an outstanding contribution to the life of the area was James Davies of Tymawr, Pentregalar; he was always known as Siams Dafi.  The Revd. J. Lloyd James writes of him “He must have attended the excellent school kept for many years at Glandwr by the Revd. John Griffiths, whose fame as a classics scholar and mathematician was spread far and wide, and in whose school many young men were prepared for colleges, both Conformist and Nonconformist, and many who received in othe education were ordained as ministers”.  Saims Dafi, teaching elder at Glandwr Chapel, was an extremely able man, and as a Surveyor of the Highways he superintended the construction of the main Cardigan to Narberth road between Bridell and Efailwen, hiring the labour and obtaining and paying for the materials.  Much of the work on this roas was carried out between 1809 and 1812, and no doubt influenced his decision to build a coaching inn at Pentregalar.  He supervised the building of other local roads, including the one leading dwon from the main road to Glandwr Chapel.

 

The Revd. John Griffiths, who had worked hard all his life, became ill towards the end of the century, and was unable to continue preaching, teaching and looking after his flock.  His younger son, William Griffiths, was away at Wrexham College at the time, training for the ministry.  The responsibility of looking after Glandwr, Rhydyceisiaid and Penygroes Chapels fell on a certified preacher, William Evans.  He was nominated a Minister with the Revd. John Griffiths on 18 November 1798.  The Revd. John Griffiths died on 7 November 1811.  His school had developed into a place for the preparation of candidates for college and the ministry, and was considered one of the most notable educational establishments  of the time.

 

John Davies (Sion Gymro) [1804-1884] was Minister of Glandwr from 1827 to 1863.  He retained his ministry over Moriah Chapel at Llanwinio after a particularly stormy period in the former Chapel.  Diaries, now at the NLW, disclose his early doubts and tendencies towards self-destruction.  To the end he nursed a desire for a large measure of loneliness, but this characteristic possibly contributed to the success of his studies of the prophets, his chief work being Y Proffwydi Byrion in 1881.

 

Penygroes Chapel, in the Parish of Whitechurch, Pembrokeshire

 

The cause began here in 1765 and the first Chapel was erected before 1800.  Members met for a number of years at a farm called Cilcam, before a Chapel was built.  Penygroes Chapel was connected with Glandŵr Chapel until 1818.  Baptisms from 1785 to 1824 are in the same register as those for Glandŵr [RG 4/3915].  Baptims from 1817 to 1837 are also in the register connected with Hebron Chapel in the parish of Llanglydwen [RG 4/3773].

 

The Chapel register from 1844 to 1940 is at the National Library of Wales [NLW MS 689B].  Baptisms, marriages and burials from 1844 to 1856 are in NLW MS 11691E.

 

John Evans [1788-1819] was a native of Llanfyrnach parish, who had none of the advantages which wealth can bring, but he poaaessed grit and faith.  After working on farms north of the Prescelli mountains, he entered the Independent ministry and was Minister of Penygroes, Hebron and Nebo from 1818 onwards.  Obituaries paid tribute to a sterling character who made a great impression on his contemporaries. 

 

Cilcam, in the Parish of Whitechurch, Pembrokeshire

 

Cilcam was an offshoot of a few Members from Cilfowyr Chapel in the parish of Manordeifi in Pembrokeshire, and they were there from about 1704.  There were undoubtedly members of this Chapel in the district, but it was not until 1787 that preaching began in this district.  In 1804 Meetings began on a regular basis, and Members worshipped in homes until Bethabara Chapel in the parish of Whitechurch was built in 1826.  The Chapel at Cilfowyr, Manordeifi, was constructed in 1716, and could be considered a branch of Rhydwilym Chapel in the parish of Llandysilio, Carmarthenshire.  Entries for Cilcam are probably amongst those of the church book for Cilfowyr, which contains baptisms from 1689 to 1797, 1806, and 1817 to 1854.  The same book has lists of accounts, restorations, from 1707 to 1797, and 1818 to 1854; excommunications, 1707 to 1797, and 1817 to 1854; deaths, 1775 to 1797, and 1817 to 1854; plus many other records [NLW MS 11108].

 

Rhydyceisiaid Chapel, in the Parish of Llangynin, Carmarthenshire

 

The cause began here in 1707, when a division took place at Henllan, which led to the formation of this Chapel and that of Glandŵr, Llanfyrnach.  The Minister from Glandŵr served here until 1800.  A Chapel was built in 1724 and rebuilt in 1777 and 1858.

 

In 1800 a division took place at Glandŵr between William Griffiths, the Minister, and William Evans.  Rhydyceisiaid sided with Mr. Evans, who took his followers and settled the cause at Hebron in the parish of Llanglydwen.  Rhydyceisiaid remained under the care of William Evans until his death in 1818.  Then it joined with Bethlehem Chapel at Pwll-Trap, St. Clears, from 1818 to 1826.  Probably John Evans (1788-1819) was the first Minister here, along with the Chapels of Hebron and Nebo, and also of Penygroes in Whitechurch.  He was a native of Llanfyrnach parish, and had worked initially on farms north of the Prescelli Mountains before entering the ministry.  After 1826 Rhydyceisiaid Chapel had its own Ministers.  Births and baptisms 1820 to 1837 are at RG 4/4022.  The church register of Glandwr, including baptisms and register of members, 1746 to 1794, may include references to members of this Chapel [NLW MS 4759E, i-ii].  Clwydwenfro Documents NLW MS 11614E contains undated membership lists of Glandwr and Rhydyceisiaid.  Baptisms and burials, 1785 to 1824 in connection with Glandwr, Llanfyrnach, are at RG 4/3915.  Clwydwenfro Documents 11076A contains membership lists for this Chapel, 1803 to 1817.

 

William Davies [1792-1861] was born at Penrhiwgaled in Cardiganshire.  He was educated at Neuaddlwyd, and after one Ministry at Llangollen, he moved to Rhydyceisiaid [1826-1861], where he combined his ministry with the maintenance of a school, giving instruction comparable with that of a grammar school.

 

Hebron Chapel, in the Parish of Llanglydwen, Carmarthenshire

 

The cause was settled here by William Evans in 1800 [see the above entry for Rhydyceisiaid].  After his death in 1818 this Chapel joined with Penygroes Chapel in the parish of Whitechurch to call a Minister.  Simon Evans (1824-1885) was appointed to this position.  He was the son of the Rev. John Evans, Minister at Hebron.  This connection continued until 1856.  From about 1850 onwards this congregation was joined with Nebo Chapel in the parish of Cilymaenllwyd.  Births and baptisms from 1818 to 1837 are in Class RG 4/3773 at the TNA and probably also contain baptisms relating to Penygroes Chapel.  Record Books for 1813 to 1927 are on microfilm at the Carmarthen Record Office.  An extensive register containing an annotated list of members of this Chapel and Nebo, Cilymaenllwyd, from 1850 to 1885, with similar lists of baptisms, admissions, admissions by transfer, dismissals, exclusions, restorations, marriages and burials during the pastorate of Simon Evans, and also for Penygroes Chapel, Whitechurch, 1844 to 1856, are in NLW MS 11691E.

 

Ramoth Chapel, in the Parish of Llanwinio, Carmarthenshire

 

The cause began here as early as 1742.  The first Chapel was built at Cwmfelin Mynach in 1765, and was enlarged in 1774, 1808 and again in 1828.  In the early years the Members went to Capel Newydd in the parish of Manordeifi for communion.  Several of the early leaders preached here regularly, and the congregation prospered under strong local leadership.  Births and baptisms from 1799 to 1837 at the TNA [RG 8/103].

 

Moriah Chapel, in the Parish of Llanwinio, Carmarthenshire

 

This was a branch of Glandŵr Chapel, Llanfyrnach.  Preaching occurred on a regular basis before the Chapel was built in 1828.  It was located near Blaenwaun in the parish of Llanwinio.  Its records are amalgamated with those of Glandŵr.

 

Bethlehem Chapel, in the Parish of St. Clears, Carmarthenshire

 

The people from this area first worshipped at Pal Mawr in the seventeenth century, along withthose who built Henllan Chapel.  After 1696, part of those who worshipped there moved to the moor between St. Clears and Laugharne.  This place was very inconvenient to those living close to St. Clears, so they moved the cause to the town in about 1745.  Preaching occurred in homes until the Chapel was built in 1765.  It was constructed with a graveyard attached, and rebuilt and enlarged in 1785 and in 1833.  The Chapel is located about one mile west of the town of St. Clears in the hamlet of Pwll-Trap.  It was connected with Henllan until 1803.

 

James Phillips was Minister here from 1814 to 1837.  Records of births and baptisms, 1770 to 1837, and burials, 1831 to 1837, are in registers RG 4/4446, RG 4/4023, RG 4/4087 and RG 4/1689 at the TNA.

 

Capel y Graig (Rock Chapel), in the Parish of Trelech, Carmarthenshire

 

Members of this Chapel were going to the Pal Mawr meeting in the parish of Kiffig in the days of Stephen Hughes.  The Chapel was established by him at Trelech shortly before his death in 1688.  The Chapel was built early in the 18th century, and enlarged in 1760 and again in 1829.  Morgan Jones was Minister here from 1789 to 1835.  David Hughes was Minister from 1839 to 1849.  Records that survive include births and baptisms, 1735 to 1837, burials 1834 to 1837 [RG 4/3483, RG 4/4024 and RG 4/2258].  Also a Register of Members, 1789 to 1915 and Contribution Registers, 19th and 20th Centuries [Carmarthen Record Office, 6370 and 6371].

 

Rhydyparc Chapel, in the Parish of Eglwys Fair a Churig, Carmarthenshire

 

A group with Arminian views, led by David Phillips, broke away from Glandŵr about 1768.[4]  They worshipped at Capel y Graig until 1788, when they left to form a Chapel.  Shortly afterwards Rhydyparc Chapel was built, around 1790.  The Chapel lay in the middle of nowhere, and the only path leading to it had to pass through the farmyard of Ffynonlas Isaf.  A new building was constructed under the leadership of Titus Evans, Onnenfawr, around 1860.  Records that survive include schedules and notes of deeds and documents relating to some Carmarthenshire Unitarian Chapels, NLW MS 4457.  Also notes made by George Eyre Evans relating to this Chapel for the period 1818 to 1907, including information about the services held there, and the deaths of members of the Chapel, NLW MS 13532A.

 

The first Minister of the Chapel, Owen Davies of Trelech [1719-1792], was born at Ffaldybrenin in 1719.  He spent some time as a teacher, becoming Minister of Capel y Graig, Trelech, in 1765.  Because he sympathised with those who broke away from Glandwr, Trelech closed the door on him and as a result he went to Rhydyparc.  He was not an Arminian in the mould of Jencyn Jones, Pantycreuddyn, nor an "Ariad" like Dafi Dafis, Castellhywel but more of a Liberal Calvinist.  Owen Davies was chosen Minister at Rhydyparc, and served there from 1787 to 1792.  When the church became Unitarian around 1791, he went off in a huff and arranged to be buried in Trelech because he was fearful that if he was buried at Rhydyparc, his grave would be desecrated.

 

The Rev. Owen Davies was followed by David Phillips, whose relations were the old faithful Blaentrefle family of that surname.  An article entitled Visit to Rhydyparc Chapel, taken from Yr Ymofynnydd (the Unitarian Magazine), December 1958, translated by Anne Owen Taylor, describes two visits made to Rhydyparc Chapel.  The first visit by Thomas Thomas took place in 1882.  Even at this time, the Minister, Jenkin William, had to cover 4 chapels at Rhydyparc, St Clears, Penrhiw and Panteg.  The second visit was in 1958.  The chapel had closed, but was in good enough condition to hold a one-off service.  The cemetery was overgrown, but 30 volunteers cleared it before they held the service.  Around this time a list was made of the monumental inscriptions.

 

MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS, RHYDYPARC CHAPEL, RECORDED BY SALI DAVIES, TRANSLATED BY ANNE OWEN TAYLOR

 

1. William Phillips, Blaentrefle, died June 14 1901, aged 70

Also Margaret Phillips, wife of the above, died Aug. 4 1913, aged 72 (second wife)

2. Mary wife of William Phillips, Castle Mawr, Llanwinio, died Jan 20 1881, aged 50 years (first wife)

Also Hannah, daughter of the above, died April 21 1878, aged 16 years

3. James, son of the above, died Oct. 20 1883, aged 26 years

Also John, son of the above died Sept 13 1888 aged 24 years

4. Anna Phillips, Dyffryn, Llanboidy parish died April 14 1858 aged 72 years

5. John, son of Rees and Amy of Blaentrefle, died March 7 1861 aged 22 years

6. Benjamin Jones, Lamb, Blaenwaun, Llanboidy, died Sept. 16 1887 aged 69 years

8. Esther, daughter of Rees and Amy Phillips, Blaentrefle, died May 14 1858 aged 16 years

10. Rees Phillips, father of William Phillips, Blaentrefle, died Nov. 12 1883 aged 84 years

Also Amy, his wife, died Dec 25 1884 aged 76 years

11. Anna Evans, daughter of John Evans, Vronscawen, Llanboidy parish, died March 6 1823 aged 6 years.

12. John Evans of Ffynonlas, late of Vronscawn, Llanboidy parish, died Dec, 26 1846 aged 70 years

13. Benjamin Griffith, Bank, parish of Llanboidy, died Sept. 27 1838, aged 64 years

Also, Phebe his wife, Feb 28 1858 aged 85 years

Also, 3 of their children - Thomas, Mary and Ann

14. John Evans, Colston, Laugharne. Born Jan 2 1839. Died May 30 1881

15. Lewis son of James & Mary Evans of Danyrhendy, parish of Llanwinio (late of Castle Lloyd in the parish of Laugharne) Died June 8 1872 , aged 21 years

16. Hannah, daughter of James and Mary Evans, Fronisaf in the chapelry of Eglwysfair. Died Nov. 14 1855 aged 16 months

17. James Evans, Danyrhendy, parish of Llanwinio. Born Jan 1804. Died April 21 1881

Also Mary Evans relist of above Born Dec 7 1809. Died April 2 1886.

18. Rees Davies, Rhyd. Died Feb 23 1827, aged 70 years

Also Esther his wife, died June 27 1822 aged 57 years

Also, Margaret, daughter of Rees & Esther Davies died Nov. 27 1820 aged 25 years

19. Rev. David Phillips, Pantymaen parish of Llanwinio (The First Minister) Died June 11 1825 aged 74 years

Also Lucy Phillips, wife of the above, died July 21 1800 aged 50 years

20. John Rees Dyffrynbroidyn, Llanboidy. Died Feb. 16 1892 aged 54 years

21. Elizabeth Rees, formerly of Dyffrynbroidyn, Llanboidy parish, died Oct. 8 1873 aged 71 years.

Also, James R. Jones, grandson of the above, died Aug. 28 1889 aged 29 years

 

22. Sarah William wife of David William Llwyngarreg, Llanwinio parish died Sept. 11 1852 aged 47 years

23. Thomas Phillips, Rhydcarlleon, parish of Llanwinio. Died Jan. 9 1843 aged 36 years

24. Esther, wife of Joseph Walters, Rhydodyn in this parish. Died June 1788 aged 60 years

25. James Phillips formerly of Rhydgoch, Llanwinio. Died Feb. 7 1845 aged 77 years

26. Theophilus Phillips, Rhosgoch, Eglwys Cwmin parish. Died Sept 16 1850 aged 89 years

27. Mary wife of Phillip Jones Rhydyparc. Died Nov. 7 1882 aged 54 years

Also Thomas son of Phillip and Mary Jones Rhydyparc. Died March 25 1855 aged 20 years

28. Mary, wife of James Phillips, Blaentrefle, Llanwinio, Died Aug 20 1848 aged 73 years

Also James Phillips, Blaentrefle, died July 4 1859

 

WELSH MANUSCRIPTS AT THE COLLEGE OF ARMS

THE WORK OF FRANCIS JONES and PETER C. BARTRUM

 

References

 

F. Jones, An Approach to Welsh Genealogy, Transactions of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion [THSC], 1948, pp. 303-466.

 

F. Jones, A Report on Welsh Manuscripts in the College of Arms, Harlean Society, 1988.  This publication is based on a typescript manuscript of the same title, first produced by Francis Jones in 1957.

 

J. Rowlands and S. Rowlands, An Approach to Welsh Family History, Volume 1, pp. and Second Stages in Researching Welsh Ancestry, FFHS, 1999, Volume 2, pp. .

 

Peter C. Bartrum, Welsh Genealogies AD 1400-1500, 18 Volumes, 1983 [ISBN 0-907158-08-0].  Also the article by Michael Powell Siddons, Using Peter Bartrum’s Welsh Genealogies, in John and Shelia Rowlands, Eds., Second Stages in Researching Welsh Ancestry, FFHS, 1999, pp. 134-146.

 

Overview

 

The 1948 article in the THSC by Francis Jones gives a classic summary of the Welsh bardic tradition and the gradual rise from this background of Welsh pedigree makers and genealogists.  The scope of the work is all-embracing, and would have been written when he was aged 40, and at the height of his powers.  The paragraphs below indicate his opinion Lewis Dwnn, of how the Protheroe MSS Collection at the College of Arms came into existence, and from this Collection the origin of the Golden Grove MSS.  The last compilation consists of 4 Volumes and is now at the Carmarthen Record Office.  The fourth Volume is an Index to the other 3 Volumes.

 

An Approach to Welsh Genealogy, pp. 375-377;

 

Lewis Dwnn

 

These critical comments on Lewis Dwnn’s published work are included here because it appeared in printed form in 1846 by Samuel Rush Meyrick, and thus is relatively easily available and widely used.

 

“Before we notice the new school that came into being at the end of the Golden Age, it will be convenient here to say a few words about those two remarkable men, Lewis Dwnn and John Williams.  The former was a member of an ancient and illustrious bonheddig family, and he took every opportunity to magnify its importance in much the same way as his pompous kinsman, Griffith Dwnn of Kidwelly had done.  Dwnn had been a disciple of William Lleyn and he was firmly grounded in the old tradition.  In 1586 he became Deputy Herald for the whole of Wales, and his immense labours between that time and 1614 have already been made available to the public [among his Manuscripts are Peniarth MS 96; Egerton MS 2585 and Peniarth MS 268 (all now at the British Library), which were printed in the Heraldic Visitations of Wales by Samuel Rush Meyrick in 1846.  NLW MS 5270B and NLW 4627E contain pedigrees in his holograph.  Egerton MS 2586, fol. 31 is in his hand, and he made notes in BM Add. MS 15041 (Book of Thomas ap Llewelyn).  Some pedigrees in the College of Arms are also in his hand].

 

It is the general experience of those who have studied and tested Dwnn’s work that his pedigrees are extremely accurate, although some curious mistakes occur, and several trees of the same families which have been entered more than once, sometimes show serious discrepancies.  I should like to mention a word of warning here.  Many years ago my late friend, Mr. Francis Green, mentioned to me that he had suspicions that much of Dwnn’s published work had suffered in transcription.  After the last war ended I found myself in London, and I then compared Meyrick’s printed Visitations with one of the original manuscripts in the British Museum.  The results of this comparison were pretty frightening.  Not a single pedigree, of the dozens that I checked, had been accurately transcribed.  Neither are the inaccuracies of a minor nature.  There are numerous examples of whole generations omitted, younger sons being made into their fathers’ brothers, younger children omitted, personal and place-names quite inaccurately transcribed, and, what is less excusable, easily-read ones left out.  In one pedigree a place-name has even been converted into the name of an elder son!  As a result of some of these errors the editor has been led into making certain footnotes, which he would have refrained from doing had it been accurately transcribed.  Another maddening thing is that headings have often been wrongly placed in the printed version.  It is also important to include words and names that Dwnn himself had scored out.  From one of these holograph corrections I was able, some time ago, to make an important identification in connection with a Pembrokeshire Plea Roll in the Public Record Office [Mr. Evan D. Jones informs me that Volume II of the Visitations is also open to similar objections.  The MS for the second Volume is at the NLW].

 

The blame is not altogether that of the transcribers, whoever these unfortunates may have been.  Those familiar with Dwnn’s vile handwriting will agree that he was a cacographist of the deepest dye.  In addition, his arrangement of the pedigrees and their infuriating untidiness, often suggests the work of a short-sighted eccentric.  But by exercising great patience, and working slowly, it is quite possible to disentangle the pedigrees and to read them accurately.  Unfortunately, in several places, where the transcribers failed to make out a word by Dwnn, they supplied what, in their opinion, it should have been.  Despite all this, Dwnn stands out as a great man.  I can only hope that the College paid him reasonably, because all he received from the Welsh gentry for his labours from 1586 to 1613 (as recorded in his work) was something under £30.

 

Dwnn was a fine genealogist, and his own preface to his work is outstanding and unique.  In it he gives a brief survey of his task, the names of the old bards, many of whom he had known and seen “aged” and “grey-headed”, and also a list of the gentry “By whom I was permitted to see old records and books from religious houses, that had been written and their materials collected by Abbots and Priors”.  He names some twenty nine important landowners who had helped him thus, and he could have named more.  His preface contains a further reference to the monasteries as sources of information: “The religious houses, who admired this science, and who exerted themselves together with the poets to assist and strengthen such a work, that the wicked might neither augment nor lessen it, nor form new pedigrees, nor lose the old ones”.  This is an interesting confirmation (if such were necessary) of the part that had been played by the priests and monks in Welsh genealogy.

 

Dwnn includes many references to other sources in the corpus of his work, and we find that he had read ancient deeds and also studied armorial seals.  His knowledge of English was far from profound, and when he essayed to write it his spelling was of a phonetic nature.  However, his knowledge of his native tongue was sound, and his writing compares favourably with that of others of his period.  His work has sometimes been decried owing to the tracing of pedigrees to Brutus and to Adam and to other fantastic origins.  But it must be clear to anyone with knowledge to the background of Welsh genealogy that Dwnn was merely recording the conventional antiquarian learning of Welsh Wales.  He must be judged according to the standards of his day.

 

 

 


THE PICTON FAMILIES OF WHITECHURCH (EGLWYSWEN), LLANFAIR NANTGWYN, MELINE, BRIDELL, LLANBOIDY [CWMFELYN MYNACH], TRELECH A’R BETTWS, LLANVIHANGEL A’R ARTH, LLANELLY AND THE USA

 

WILLIAM PICTON, one of the younger sons of Owen Picton of Nevern (d. ca 1636/40), seems to have been the first member of the Picton family to establish himself permanently in the parish of Whitechurch.  He had children baptised there from 1675 onwards, and was described as of Whitechurch at his death in 1696.  However, John Picton, his elder brother, was already living in Whitechurch by 1653 when he died.  This raises the question whether William Picton was the first occupant of the farm, later known as Ty’r bwlch farm, or did he take over the farm upon the death of John Picton in 1653, or upon that of his widow, Catherine Picton, in 1678.

 

Although Owen Picton of Nevern [d. 1636/40], the father of William Picton of Whitechurch [d. 1696], had several other sons, it would appear that upon the death of Robert Picton of Cardigan in 1752, when the male line of descent from his son, Owen Picton of Cardigan, became extinct, that all current living Picton male descendants of Owen Picton of Nevern come through William Picton of Whitechurch [d. 1696] and his only known son, Owen Picton of Whitechurch (1675-1738).  These Picton descendants can be traced back ultimately to Philip Picton of Newport, who married Maud Dyer and lived around 1250-1280.

 

Also, with the exception of the Rev. Thomas Picton (1775-1861) of Whitechurch and later of New Jersey, the only surviving son of Owen Picton of Whitechurch (1744-1780), all these descents also pass through his younger brother, Thomas Picton of Tyrbwlch Farm in the parish of Whitechurch (1749-1836).  The Rev. Thomas Picton had an only son, John Moore White Picton of New Jersey and New Orleans (1799-1859), who has left an extensive family in Louisiana, Texas and elsewhere.

 

The Topography of Whitechurch Parish

 

The parish of Whitechurch rises up the north slope of the Prescelli Hills, and the land closest to the hills would always have been the poorer farming land compared to the lands lower down in the parish and by the streams.  The main stream, flowing from east to west, is now called the Afon Nyfer and its smaller tributary, the Afon Bannon, flows down from the eastern end of the main Prescelli hills.  The farm of Ty’r bwlch fronted onto some of the remaining Common Land in 1839, as shown on the Tithe Map.  The Common Land stretched all the way up to the summit of the Prescelli Hills.  Perhaps either John Picton or William Picton may have been the first occupier and farmer to try and cultivate the particular piece of land on which Ty’r bwlch now stands.

 

Clearly, in predominantly agricultural areas, a large increase in population had a dramatic effect on the landscape as human resources would have been available for the creation of new farms, for bringing waste land into cultivation and for improving the infrastructure.  Records show that there was a steady increase in population from 1563 (the time of the first reliable records) to the mid 19th-century.  In the Hundred of Cemais there was a trebling or greater increase in the number of households between 1563 and 1801.[5]  The numbers in the Tables below are taken from E. T. Lewis, North of the Hills, 1972, pp. 301-303.

 

POPULATION CHANGE IN FIVE PARISHES IN CEMAIS

BORDERING THE PRESCELLI HILLS, 1670 to 1901

 

Year

Eglwyswrw

Eglwyswen

(Whitechurch)

Llanfair Nantgwyn

Meline

Nevern

1585

100 (est)

-

-

-

-

1600

110 (est)

-

-

-

-

1670

200 (est)

240 (est) for both parishes combined

260 (est)

740 (est)

1801

434

436 for both parishes combined

408

1283

1811

463

274

190

 

 

1841

560

395

241

492

1625

1851

559

349

201

475

1642

1901

393

244

165

297

982

 

Parish

1801 Census – Number of Houses

1841 Census – Number of Houses

Area of Parish (acres) from Tithe Map

Nevern

274

329

14735

Meline

102

111

4523

Eglwyswrw

97

147

3701

Eglwyswen (Whitechurch)

54 (estimated)

85

2519

Llanfair Nantgwyn

40 (estimated)

47

1693

 

In a parish which contained large tracts of open moorland and marginal land, but no industry, such a population increase must indicate the founding of new farms and the concomitant loss of moor and common.  In the Prescelli area, vast tracts of common, waste and mountain were available for colonisation, and during the period of rapid population increase down to the mid 19th-century, many new farms were founded and previously uncultivated land brought under the plough.  It is generally the land lying between 200 and 300 metres that was settled and taken into cultivation in this period.  Below 200 metres the land had been permanently settled for many centuries, and above 300 metres the open moorland was generally too hostile for farming.  On the northern side of the Prescelli Mountains fertile, fairly low-lying farmland rises suddenly into high open moorland, and therefore there was only a narrow band of land suitable for colonisation.  Nevertheless, the Tithe Survey of around 1840 records encroachments along the fringes of this common land.  On the ground these encroachments are now characterised by small agricultural holdings - cottages or small houses with no, or a limited range of, out-buildings, in a landscape of small, irregular fields.  Many of the settlements on the upper fringes of these encroachments have now been abandoned.  The farms of Ty’r bwlch, Tycanol and Coedcefnlas Uchaf all lie approximately along the 500 feet contour line, whereas that of Maesgwyn is 100 feet lower at 400 feet.

 

The vast majority of the modern field pattern either evolved from open-field systems during the 17th- to 19th-century or was newly created by the enclosure of moor and waste during the same period.  The form and character of the fields often provide clues to their date and method of creation.  For instance, enclosure by Act of Parliament resulted in a very regular, rectilinear pattern, while small-scale encroachments on common land produced a landscape of small, irregular fields.  The most common historic boundary is undoubtedly the earth and stone bank; though this type includes the Pembrokeshire hedgebank - alternate layers of turf and stone.  This is only occasionally recorded in the Prescelli region.  Simple banks of earth mixed with stone predominate.  The proportion of earth to stone varies according to local availability.  In some locations, but particularly alongside roads and tracks, and often for quite short lengths, these banks are faced with dry-stone walling, presumably to afford protection from traffic and stock.  At higher elevations, but also at lower levels, banks composed almost entirely of stone rubble can be found.

 

It is the norm for boundary banks to be topped with hedges.  The type, quality and management condition of hedges can be important in determining the character of an area.  At lower altitudes in sheltered locations well maintained hedges sometimes with hedgerow trees provide the appearance of a tightly enclosed landscape.  On higher more exposed slopes hedges are often reduced to straggling lines of bushes or have entirely gone and been replaced by wire fences.  This creates a softer aspect to the landscape and provides a zone of transition between the lower, tightly enclosed landscape and higher open moorland.

 

The Picton Family at Whitechurch, 1653-1836

 

OWEN PICTON of Whitechurch, husbandman, in Co. Pembroke, the only known surviving son of William Picton of Whitechurch (see PICTON of Newport and Nevern) was bapt. 22 December 1675 at Whitechurch, Pembrokeshire.  The parish church of Whitechurch, known in Welsh as Eglwyswen, has a stone in the porch inscribed 1591.[6]  The early Bishops’ Transcripts of Whitechurch at the National Library of Wales (NLW) describe the parish as ‘Whitechurch and Nantgwyn’, and it is probable that Llanvair Nantgwyn did not have its own parish registers for some considerable period of its existence.

 

Owen Picton married Mary Thomas, and probably lived at Ty’r bwlch Farm.  The farm still exists, and although the present farmhouse dates from 1856, some of the outbuildings may have been built as early as the sixteenth century.  The Tithe Map for 1839 shows its extent and the layout of the two buildings which then made up the farm.  There are slit windows in buildings where animals would have been sheltered in winter, and the other end of the building might have been used for human habitation, a common feature of the “long houses” of the period.  The farm lies on a north-facing, rather bleak slope of the Prescelli Mountains, some three miles north-west of Crymych, and looks down on the site where Penygroes Independent Chapel was built in 1765, and where several generations of the Picton family were to be baptised and buried.  As the chapels were not licensed for marriages at that time, these always had to take place in the churches of the Established Church in Wales.  Many of the older gravestones in the chapels have fallen over the years and may well have been removed from their original places.  They now stand in central rows, but many of the inscriptions are still legible (1988).  Ty’r bwlch Farm remained in the hands of the Picton family, as tenant farmers, until the early 1820s, when all the children of Thomas and Ann Picton (formerly Morris) appear to have migrated to new settlements.  The farm is approached along a narrow and very uneven track, which is best negotiated on foot.  The area of the farm in 1839 was 30 acres 2 roods and 6 perches.  In order to understand the history of the nonconformist settlement at Penygroes in the parish of Whitechurch it is necessary to appreciate the history of its establishment and operation by the early Ministers responsible for the congregation established there.

 

Penygroes Chapel, Whitechurch

 

As Penygroes Chapel plays such a prominent part in the lives of the Picton families living in the locality from at least 1785 to the twentieth century, it is worth saying a few words about its history.  Before the Chapel was built, members met for a number of years at a farm called Cilcam.  Cilcam can either be the house of that name, which lies between the farms of Tycanol and Treowen, or there is a small property, Cilcam-bach, lying just to the west of Tycanol.  There is even a suggestion that Tycanol could be known as Cilcam-ganol, in which case it is synonymous with the farm of Tycanol itself.  These early Chapels frequently drew their congregations from a very wide catchment area.

 

Penygroes Chapel was connected with Glandwr Chapel in the parish of Llanfyrnach up to 1818, and members of Glandwr were associated also with Rhydyceisiaid Chapel in the parish of Llangynin, as the Minster at Glandwr served at Rhydyceisiaid also up to 1800.  From July 1818, when a new Minister, John Evans, took over, Penygroes Chapel was connected with Hebron Chapel in the parish of Llanglydwen, Carmarthenshire.  Thus baptisms for the years 1818 to 1837 for Penygroes Chapel are in Class RG 4/3773 at the National Archives, along with those for Hebron Chapel, Llanglydwen.  For the period 1785 to 1824 baptisms and burials may be found in Class RG 4/3915 in combination with those for Glandwr, Llanfyrnach [Bert J. Rawlins, The Parish Churches and Nonconformist Chapels of Wales: Their Records and Where to Find Them, Volume 1, Cardigan-Carmarthen-Pembroke, Celtic Heritage Publishing, Salt Lake City, 1987].  No registers survive before 1765.[7]  Between 1818 and 1844 some entries may also be in the register of Hebron Chapel, Llanglydwen [RG 4/3773].

 

From Hebron Chapel in Llanglydwen to Ramoth Chapel in Cwmfelin Mynach is about 3.5 miles as the crow flies, but about 4 or more miles by road, in an approximately south-easterly direction.  Hebron Chapel is south-west from Glandwr Chapel in the parish of Llanfyrnach, and the distance is only about one mile.  From Hebron Chapel to Penygroes Chapel in Whitechurch the distance is just over 5 miles as the crow flies.  But, due to the fact that the end of the Prescelli Hills lie between the two places, to travel by car today would be a distance of 7-8 miles.  Thus in days gone by, when the Minister would have walked or ridden between the two chapels, and thought nothing of going over or round the hilltops, he would have had a more direct route between the two Chapels, but still of probably more than 6 miles.

 

The Chapel register of Penygroes, 1844 to 1940, is at the NLW, MS 6898.  Baptisms, marriages and burials, 1844 to 1856 are in NLW MS 11691E.  This manuscript contains an extensive register of entries during the pastorate of Simon Evans (1844-1856).  From about 1850 onwards, Hebron Chapel became joined to Nebo Chapel, in the parish of Cilymaenlwyd.  Baptisms and burials, 1785 to 1824, in connection with Glandwr, Llanfyrnach, are in RG 4/3915 at the TNA, as described above.  In 1800 a division occurred between W. Griffith, the Minister at Glandwr, and William Evans.  Mr. Evans took his followers and settled the cause at Hebron Chapel, Llanglydwen.  The Chapel at Hebron was built in 1804 and enlarged in 1824.  After the death of William Evans in 1818 the Chapel at Hebron joined with Penygroes to call a new Minister, and this connection between the two Chapels continued until 1856.

 

A useful little book on the early history of Penygroes Chapel, in Welsh, is The History of Penygroes Chapel [Penygroes, Ty Cwrdd Annibynwyr Blaenau bro Nan-hyfer: Gyrfa Dwy Ganrif] by Caleb and Stephen Rees, 1902.  An English version exists: Pen-y-groes, Pembrokeshire, The Story of Two Centuries, Oldham, 1967.  By 1803 the membership of Penygroes Chapel was 52, of whom 39 had been associated with Glandŵr.  This was because the founder and first minister of Penygroes, John Griffiths (1765 to 1803), came from Glandŵr.  There is an interesting statement in the book by E. T. Lewis, North of the Hills, 1972, p. 115, in which he says “We must turn south-eastwards to observe the immediate ancestor of Penygroes [Chapel].  Members of the Glandŵr church came from a large hinterland and during the 18th century branches were formed at Rhydyceisiaid, Capel Iwan and St. Dogmaels.  These influences reached Eglwyswen, for worship appears to have been frequent at Cilcam-ganol for a period before Penygroes was built.  It has already been observed that Cilcam had been in the first decade of the 18th century a sanctuary for Baptist adherents; apparently it bore the alternative name of Tycanol”.

 

The Picton Family at Whitechurch from 1724

 

Owen Picton’s wife, Mary Picton, was buried at Whitechurch on 5 May 1724.  Owen Picton, then a widower, was buried at Whitechurch on 3 August 1738.  Owen Picton left a will, dated 20 October 1733, and proved on 2 November 1738 before Surrogate Evan Davies [St. Davids’ Archdeaconary Court].  His will was witnessed by George Bowen and Thomas Bowen, and it could be useful to establish to which branch of the numerous Bowen families these individuals belonged – were they tied into the Bowen family of Llwyngwair?  An inventory of his estate was made the day after his burial, on 4 August 1738, by John Thomas, Richard George and Thomas George and gave a valuation of £17:11s:9d.[8]  Owen and Mary Picton were the parents of:

 

1.  THOMAS PICTON, bapt. 29 January 1703 at Whitechurch and buried there on 6 February 1726/7.

 

2.  GEORGE PICTON, bapt. 1706 at Whitechurch and buried there on 24 October 1726.

 

3.  JAMES PICTON, bapt. 1709 at Whitechurch and buried there on 3 July 1711.

 

4.       MARGARET PICTON, bapt. 1711 at Whitechurch.  She was joint executrix and was to receive one third of her father’s estate according to his will (1733).  She married John Philip on 23 November 1738 at Whitechurch.  She was buried on 20 October 1758 at Whitechurch.  Did John Philip leave a will?  John Phillip of Llanfyrnach left a will, 1776, No. 28; also John Phillip of Llandyfriog, 1769, No. 2.

 

5.  JOHN PICTON, of Ty’r bwlch Farm, farmer, was bapt. 4 February 1713/4 at Whitechurch.  He was the eldest surviving son at the time of his father’s will, and thus was appointed joint executor and was to receive one third of his father’s estate (1733).  An account book, kept by him, was later used as the Whitechurch parish register.  This shows that in 1740 he either paid, or received from Diana Picton, Owen Picton and Mary Picton the sums of 2s, 4s and 2s respectively.  He married Mary ----- [maiden surname yet to be established], who was living when he made his will in 1789, and who was to inherit his estate during her lifetime.

 

John Picton is mentioned in the will of Robert Picton of Cardigan, dated 30 May 1752, as his kinsman, which helps to establish the somewhat distant link between the Cardigan and Whitechurch branches of the Picton family.  Robert Picton of Cardigan and John Picton of Whitechurch were, in fact, second cousins – sharing a common ancestor in Owen Picton of Nevern, who had died around 1640.  In the earliest surviving Land Tax Return for Whitechurch, taken in 1786, John Picton is recorded as the occupier of Ty’r bwlch.[9]  The owner of Ty’r bwlch was James Bowen, Esq., who lived at the mansion house at Whitechurch, close to the parish church.  As yet it has not been possible to establish to which branch of the numerous Bowen families in Pembrokeshire he belonged, but the Christian name of James is common in the family of Bowen of Llwyngwair in the parish of Nevern.  The main branch is described by Francis Jones in Bowen of Pentre Ifan and Llwyngwair [The Pembrokeshire Historian, Volume 6, 1979, pp. 25-57].  James Bowen was a substantial landowner as the Land Tax Return shows he also owned Dyffrynmawr, Penlan and Velindre in Whitechurch and Cidigill ucha, Berthlwyd, Bwlchyomeglwyd (?), Trynnonewen [or Frynnonewen] and Trecorn (?) in Llanvair Nantgwyn.  A James Bowen was rector of Whitechurch from 27 April 1753 to 21 May 1759, but whether he was related to the James Bowen of 1786 is not known at present.[10]

 

John Picton left a will, dated 13 October 1789, and probate of his estate was granted to his son, Thomas Picton, in place of his widow and relict, Mary Picton, on 17 March 1793 by John Evans, surrogate [SD 1793/23].  The will was witnessed by John Davies, Margaret Davies and William Davies; and John Picton made his mark.  No inventory survives of his estate.  The date of his death and that of his widow, Mary Picton, have yet to be established.  If they were buried at Penygroes Chapel, as seems likely, then there are no register entries for these years.  It could be that she died between 1789 and 1793, and John Picton’s will was not proved until after her death.  As well as the records of Penygroes Chapel, any surviving Land Tax Returns from 1789 to 1794 could be useful here, and would show when John Picton was succeeded at the farm by his son, Thomas Picton.  John and Mary Picton were the parents of:

 

a.  OWEN PICTON, of Nant Gwynn in the parish of Eglwyswrw, was bapt. 12 August 1744 at Whitechurch.  He was admitted to the membership of the Independent Chapel at Glandŵr in the parish of Llanfyrnach on 10 December 1765.  He subscribed to Attebion Irai Achosion Cydwybod Ar Amryw Ystyriaethau Pwysfawr. Gan S. Pike, a S. Hayward. Gwedi ei gyhoeddi yn Gymraeg, Gan y Parch. Mr. J. Griffith., 1769, GRIFFITH, J.. Carmarthen Argraffwyd gan Ioan Ross, yn Heol-Awst, 1769. [Pris Swllt, heb rwymo Subject: religion].

Owen Picton of Eglwyswen is recorded as a doctrinal elder in a document of 21 November 1778 [J. L. James, History of Glandŵr Church, 1902 (in Welsh)].  This makes it almost certain he was one of the founder members of Penygroes Chapel in 1765.  Owen Picton married Margaret Phillips (?).  Her surname is uncertain and the date of their marriage is unknown at present, but the marriage must have taken place prior to 1775.  The loss of the marriage registers for the parish of Whitechurch between 1759 and 1812 means this marriage entry may not survive.  Administration of his goods and estate was granted to his widow, Margaret Picton, on 9 November 1780 and the value of his estate was £248:1s:0d [SD 1780/53].

 

In the 1841 Census the farm at Nant Gwynn at Eglwyswrw was either in the hands of Martha Rees, aged ‘60’, a widow, or with James Williams, a farmer aged 65 [HO 107/1446/6/7].  The Tithe Map and Schedule of Eglwyswrw should be consulted [IR 29/54/28 and IR 30/54/28].

 

His widow, Margaret Picton of the parish of Llanfair Nantgwyn, made a will, dated 20 February 1786.  She appointed her landlord, Mr. Bowen [presumably James Bowen], as guardian of her four children.  She appointed Thomas Thomas of Maesgwyn, Stephen Morris and Thomas Picton executors and trustees.[11]  This is the first clear association of the Picton family with the farm of Maesgwyn.  The will was witnessed by Lewis Davies.  Margaret Picton was buried at Whitechurch on 22 February 1787 [Glandŵr Nonconformist Register, RG 4/3915].  Her will was proved on 2 August 1787, but her estate had been valued at £636 16s 9d by Thomas Picton and William Davies on 10 October 1786.  The valuation was made by William Davies and Thomas Picton, her brother-in-law.  It should be possible to deduce where the family was living from the earliest Land Tax Returns for Eglwyswrw, which should show her as a widow.  None of their children were mentioned in the will of their grandfather, John Picton (1789).  Owen and Margaret Picton were the parents of:

 

i.          THOMAS PICTON, born 1 May 1775 at Whitechurch.  He emigrated to New York in 1796, and was probably the first member of any Picton family from Pembrokeshire to make the voyage to America to begin a new life (see PICTON of New Jersey, New Orleans and Texas).  It is important to read the account of his career, as he retained contact with his relatives in Wales, notably Owen Picton of Glanrhyd in the parish of Trelech, up to 1858 – within 3 years of his death in 1861.  He also mentioned Stephen Morris of Coedcefnlas, Rachel Marsden, John John of Felinwrdan and Mr. John D. Griffiths, Glandŵr, in a letter of 1853.  He remembered how they all looked 60 years ago.

 

ii.  MARY PICTON, born at Whitechurch.  She married David Philip on 23 October 1800 at Whitechurch [Witnesses: (?)].  Mary Philip was living in 1853, as she is mentioned in a letter from the Rev. Thomas Picton.  She should be in the 1851 Census index for Pembrokeshire at the Pembrokeshire Record Office.  There is a David Philip living at Rhosmaen lodge, Newchurch, Carmarthenshire, in the 1851 Census, an agricultural labourer aged 70, born at Abernant [HO 107/2474/68].  Also living with him was his wife, Mary Philip, aged 73, and daughter Jane Philip, aged 30.  This is the only reasonable candidate for the person, known to be alive in 1845.  The 1861 Census index does not have any record of her.

 

iii.          MARGARET PICTON, born ca 1778/9 at Whitechurch.  There is no entry for her baptism in the register of Penygroes Chapel.  She married Godfrey Marsden of Maesgwyn on 19 November 1805 at Whitechurch [Witnesses: (?)].  The Marsden families have an association with Whitechurch, and especially Pontfaen in that parish.[12]  Godfrey Marsden was buried on 1 February 1809 at Penygroes Chapel, Whitechurch, aged 30.  Margaret Marsden of Maesgwyn was in a list of members of Penygroes Chapel in September 1818 [RG 4/3773].  She must be the Margaret Marsden, living at Maesgwyn, Whitechurch, in the 1841 Census, aged ‘60’, Independent [HO 107/1448/28/5], which must mean she emigrated to the USA after this date, and thus either went with her son, Thomas Marsden, or followed a year or two later when he and his family had settled at Centerville.

 

Margaret Marsden emigrated to America, and was living at Centerville, Allegany County, New York State, in 1845, when she was mentioned in a letter of her brother, Thomas Picton of New York.  Her brother, the Rev. Thomas Picton, in his will of 1846, mentions a Bond and Mortgage executed by his nephew, Thomas Marsden of Centerville, Allegany County.  It was his desire that the interest from that Bond should be given to his sister, Margaret Marsden, and on her death it should be cancelled.  A Margaret Wells [(sic.) –this entry should probably have been Marsden (?)] was living with Thomas Marsden and his family at Centerville, Allegany County, New York State, in the 1850 US Census, aged 71.  This age would tally with her age given on her tombstone on her death in 1856.  Unfortunately her country of birth is not given in the 1850 Census entry, it is left blank.

 

It is also worth pointing out that letters survive written from Thomas Picton of Westfield and Princeton to his cousin, Owen Picton of Glanrhyd, Trelech, between 1845 and 1858 [Carmarthen Record Office, ACC 4199-4204].  The original letters were in the possession of Mrs Williams of Mount Pleasant, Llangynin, but the date of deposit of the typescript is not yet known.  This begs the question of what relationship Mrs Williams was, if any, to Owen Picton of Glanrhyd, Trelech.  These surviving letters certainly establish that there was communication across the Atlantic between the various Picton and Marsden families up to at least 1858.  As Owen Picton of Trelech was undoubtedly in contact with his cousin, Jacob Picton of Llanboidy, and his children, including Stephen Picton, it would seem that there would be a mechanism whereby the children of Jacob Picton were kept in occasional touch with the fortunes of their kinsfolk in America.

 

Fortunately the tombstone of Margaret Marsden survives and was recorded recently [2004] by Barbara Henry [Siloam Road Enterprises, PO Box 346, Perry, NY].  This says that Margaret Marsden, wife of Godfrey Marsden, died on 15 June 1856, aged 77.  She is buried in County Line Cemetery, County Line Road, Centerville, Allegany County, NY.  “Our grandmother” was inscribed on the back of her tombstone.  The reference to her long-deceased husband, Godfrey Marsden, is quite poignant.  Perhaps the role played by Margaret Marsden and her children in the later emigration of Stephen Picton and his family in 1870 has been overlooked.  Was a correspondence maintained between her children, perhaps Thomas Marsden in particular, following his mother’s death, and their relatives back in Carmarthenshire?  A surviving list of early church members suggests Margaret Marsden was a founding member of the Welsh Chapel at Centerville in 1846.

 

The County Line Cemetery is located in Centerville on the east side of County Line Road at the four corners with Findlay and Baird Roads.  It is currently classified as an “abandoned cemetery” and, according to New York State Law, is now under the care of the Town of Centerville.  Early on, the cemetery was associated with Welsh immigrants who settled on the western side of Centerville and in adjacent Freedom.  This area was referred to as “The Welsh Settlement”.  In the mid-1840s the Welsh Congregationalists met at a school house (no longer standing) located in Freedom on the west side of County Line Road, opposite the cemetery site.  In summer 1846 they formed a religious society, and in 1847 they erected a 30' x 30' meeting house called Carmel opposite the school house on the east side of County Line Road in Centerville.  A squarish growth pattern of vegetation was visible on the site in 1992-1994, and may indicate the position of the former chapel.

 

A Welsh burial on or near this site was reported in 1846.  Later, an unknown number of Welsh and non-Welsh burials were made over the years.  Many stones in the County Line Cemetery are currently down or missing.  Others are not legible or broken.  Existing stones date from 1850-1875 with at least one burial (Stimson) made at the turn-of-the century or in the twentieth century.  Burials for Fairview-Centerville area Welsh were also made at the Siloam Cemetery, Maple Grove Road, Freedom, NY.  The Fairview and Siloam Welsh Congregational churches shared a Minister for many years.

 

Centerville was formed from Pike, Wyoming County, on 15 January 1819 and lies in the north-west corner of Allegany County.  The first settlements were made by Joseph Maxson of Rhode Island in April 1808 and by James Ward in the fall of the same year.  The first religious meeting (Baptist) was held by the Rev. John Griffith.  The first church (Presbyterian) was formed in July 1824, by the Rev. Silas Hubbard.  A useful book of the early history is by John Stearns Minard, Allegany County and Its People : A Centennial Memorial History of Allegany County, New York.  Also Histories of the Towns of the County, Alfred, N.Y., W. A. Fergusson & Co., [c1896].

 

The south-western part of the town was often referred to as the “Welsh Settlement”.  A large proportion of the population of that section were Welsh Congregationalists (also called Independents), who began to settle there from about 1840 onwards, and also at Fairview in Allegany County.  They came from Welsh settlements in central New York State and from Wales itself.  They worshipped at several sites.  At first all the Welsh in the area (Baptists, Congregationalists, and Calvinistic Methodists) worshipped together in union meetings.  The Baptists, primarily located in the Freedom Flats area, organized separately in 1843.  Before 1846 Welsh Congregationalists and Calvinistic Methodists met together on the western side of the Town of Centerville, near the County line, an area referred to as the “Welsh Settlement”.  The Congregationalists built their first meeting house, called Carmel, in 1847 on Lot 59 on the County Line Road on the Centerville side, just opposite the Freedom schoolhouse.  An 1846 building contract is in the church records in Boston, MA.  A portion of the lot was used for burials.  The church and schoolhouse are no longer standing.  The original Carmel church of 1847 is said to have burned down after a lightning strike in the early 1920s.  The house of worship was used later as a school-house, the members of the society worshipping in Cattaraugus County.

 

In 1865 a new church, initially called Bethel, was constructed several miles south at Fairview Corners, Centerville, Lot 57.  A new church building replaced it in 1902.  During much of this time the church was referred to as the Fairview Welsh Congregational Church.  The church was closed about 1928, and sometime after that the church was torn down with various sections incorporated into other nearby buildings.  Early burials were made at what is now the County Line Cemetery in the back portion of Lot 59.  Later burials for many Fairview Welsh were made at the Siloam Cemetery, Maple Grove Road, Freedom, NY.  The Fairview and Siloam Welsh Congregational churches shared a Minister for many years.

 

After the closure of the Fairview church, a local individual, probably connected to the church, apparently kept the records.  At some point the records were transferred to the Congregational Church authorities.  They became part of the Lisle Collection, "a storeroom of old records" at the retreat center maintained by the New York Conference of the United Church of Christ at Lisle, NY, south of Syracuse.  Contents of most of the boxes were intermingled from one church with another, and some materials were not even identified.  In 1979 this archive was transferred to the Congregational Library in Boston where it was organized and made available.

 

The population change in Centerville between 1830 and 1875 is tabulated below.

 

Year

Population

1830

1195

1835

1426

1840

1513

1845

1436

1850

1441

1855

1304

1860

1323

1865

1181

1870

1043

1875

997

 

Pontfaen [Pontvaen] and the Marsden Family

 

It is not yet quite clear if this is the same Pontfaen which was an ecclesiastical parish and had a church in the records, or just the name of a farm in the parish of Whitechurch.  There are no Census Returns for a parish called Pontfaen, for example, in the 1851 Census of the area.

 

In the 1804 Land Tax Return, the owner of Pontfaen was Abraham Leach, Esq.[13]  James Morris was the occupier of Pontfaen in the 1786 Land Tax Return.  William Marsden of Pontfaen was buried at Whitechurch on 7 August 1825, aged 79.  Thomas Marsden of Whitechurch married Phoebe James at Eglwys Fair a Churig on 3 April 1820 [Witnesses: ].  Thomas Marsden of Whitechurch, a widower, and Mary Hughes of Eglwyswrw, spinster, were married at Whitechurch on 25 November 1827 [Witnesses: John John and Thomas Hughes].  Phoebe Marsden of Llanglydwen married John David of Cilymaenllwyd on 28 December 1827 at Cilymaenllwyd.  A marriage licence exists for this marriage [A. 42/124].  Mary Marsden of Pontfaen, was buried at Whitechurch on 7 February 1833; but she cannot be the second wife of Thomas Marsden of Pontfaen.

 

Thomas Marsden was a farmer at Pontfaen, and had children baptised at Whitechurch from 1828 onwards.  He is presumably the Thomas Marsden, who was a tenant farmer at Pontfaen Farm in the parish of Whitechurch on the 1839 Tithe Map.  The landowner was Henry Leach and the area of the farm was 110 acres 2 roods and 13 perches (Field Nos. 384-414 on the Tithe Map).  In the 1841 Census Thomas Marsden was living at Pontvane, a farmer aged 45, with his wife, Mary Marsden, and children Mary Marsden, aged 18; Margaret Marsden, aged 15; David Marsden, aged 13; Mariah Marsden, aged 12; Elizabeth Marsden, aged 10; William Marsden, aged 10; Ann Marsden, aged 7; Thomas Marsden, aged 4 and Elinor Marsden, aged 1 [HO 107/ / /3].

 

Thomas Marsden was living at Pontvane in the parish of Whitechurch in the 1851 Census, a farmer of 110 acres, aged 57, born at Llanglydwen, Carmarthenshire (ca 1793/4) [HO 107/2481/213].  Also living with him were his wife, Justina Marsden, aged 41, born at Nevern.  Thomas and Justina Marsden were living with the following Marsden children.  David Marsden (23); Mariah Marsden (21); Elizabeth Marsden (20); Ann Marsden (16) and Eleanor Marsden (11) [Carmarthen, March 1840, 27 51].  Mary Marsden, his second wife, had died in 1846 [Cardigan, June 1846, 27 30].  A Justina Lewis married in 1847 [Cardigan, March 1847, 27 65].  Thomas Marsden was living at Pontfaen in the 1861 Census, a farmer of 110 acres, aged 68, born at Llanglydwen, Carmarthenshire.  Also living with him was his wife, Justina Marsden, aged 52, and children David Marsden, married, aged 33; Maria Marsden, unmarried, aged 32; Ann Marsden, unmarried, aged 27; Thomas Marsden, aged 24 and Elinor Marsden, aged 21 [RG 9/4174/47].

 

Thomas Marsden was still living at Pontfaen in the 1871 Census, aged 77, a farmer of 110 acres, with his wife, Christina Marsden [spelt thus in the Census, and not as Justina], aged 64, born at Nevern, and their daughter, Elinor Marsden, aged 30, born at Whitechurch; Thomas Marsden was born in Carmarthenshire (no parish given) [RG 10/5539/71].  Thomas Marsden of Pontfaen, farmer, died on 24 December 1872, aged 79 [Cardigan, December 1872, 11b 3] and was buried at Whitechurch on 27 December 1872.  He left a will which was proved by William Williams of Trellyfaint in the parish of Nevern and David Marsden of Longford in the parish of Llandewi Velfry, farmer, the executors, on 9 June 1873.  His estate was valued at less than £450.  Justina Marsden, his wife, was still living at Pontvane in the 1881 Census of Whitechurch, a widow aged 70, born at Nevern [RG 11/5426/73], together with her niece, Justina Jones, aged 10, born at Monington.  Justina Marsden died on 7 November 1886, aged 80 [Cardigan, December 1886, 11b 2].  She left a will, which was proved on 21 December 1886 by William Williams of Trellyfaint in the parish of Nevern, farmer, nephew and sole executor.  The value of her estate was £197:9s:2d.

 

Trellyfaint farm was occupied in the 1881 Census by Morris Williams, a widower aged 88, a farmer of 374 acres, and his son, William Williams, aged 54 [RG 11/5425/81].  The Census entry just says they were born in Pembrokeshire.  Trellyfaint farm was occupied in the 1871 Census by Morris Williams, a widower and farmer, aged 76, and his two sons, William Williams, aged 45 and Griffith Williams, aged 25 [RG 10/5538/89].  They were all born at Nevern.  Morris Williams was living at Trellyfaint in the 1851 Census, a farmer of 370 acres, aged 57, together with his wife, Bridget Williams, aged 50, and their children William Williams, aged 25; Morris Williams, aged 23; Thomas Williams, aged 18 and Griffith Williams, aged 5 [HO 107/2481/10].  Also staying with them was Martha Bowen, a widow aged 70, a farmer’s wife.  Unfortunately the Census entry again just says they were all born in Pembrokeshire.  Morris Williams married Bridget Morris on 3 May 1825 at Nevern.  A search needs to be made of the 1841 Census of Nevern to look for a Justina Williams or Justina Morris, born in that parish around 1810.  The marriage entry of Thomas Marsden to Justina Morris or Justina Williams can also be searched for between 1845 and 1851.

 

Other Marsden Families of Whitechurch

 

Robert Marsden of Whitechurch and Mary Jenkins of Castellan were married at Penrhydd [Chapel (?)] on 10 July 1817 [Witnesses; ].  Robert Marsden of Blaenffoes was buried at Whitechurch on 8 March 1832, aged 35.  William Marsden and Rachel Morris were married at Whitechurch on 18 November 1803 [Witnesses: ].  Godfrey Marsden Jones was bapt. at Whitechurch on 28 April 1833, the son of Thomas and Mary Jones of Eglwyswrw.  There are no Marsden wills in St. Davids Archdeaconary records up to 1858.

 

Godfrey and Margaret Marsden had at least two children:

 

a.     THOMAS MARSDEN, bapt. 15 January 1807 at Whitechurch parish church.  Thomas Marsden of Maesgwyn in Whitechurch, a bachelor, and Elizabeth Husband, a spinster, were married by banns on 5 September 1830 at Whitechurch [Witnesses: Thomas Marsden, Mary Marsden].  They had several children baptised at Whitechurch, where he was described as a farmer of Maesgwyn, the last one of whom was baptised in 1837.  It would seem that John Picton of Whitechurch (1793-1875), son of Thomas Picton of Tycanol, Whitechurch, took over the tenancy of Maesgwyn Farm.  John Picton was the tenant there on the 1839 Tithe Schedule and Thomas Lloyd of Haverfordwest was the owner.  It would be worth confirming that Thomas Marsden had left Whitechurch by the time of the 1841 Census.  If so, it would mean that the family emigrated to the USA between June 1837 and March 1839.

 

By 1844 the family had definitely emigrated to the USA and had settled at Centerville, New York State, where they were visited by their uncle, the Rev. Thomas Picton in that year [Carmarthen RO, Acc. 4199].  Thomas Marsden owned a farm of 62 acres, towards the purchase of which the Rev. Thomas Picton had loaned him 750 dollars.  From there he remained in communication with his uncle, when he returned to Hoboken, New Jersey.  Indeed the Rev. Thomas Picton mentions to his cousin back in Wales that he has endeavoured to provide for his dear sister, Margaret Marsden, during her life.  Presumably this emigration from the farm at Maesgwyn was the reason why it was taken over by John Picton.  It will be interesting to see if Thomas Marsden and his family are in the 1841 Census of Whitechurch.

 

Thomas Marsden was a farmer living in Centerville, Allegany County, N.Y., in the 1850 US Census, aged 43, born in Wales, with his wife, Elizabeth Marsden, aged 49.  They were living there also in 1851 and 1853, according to letters written home by the Rev. Thomas Picton.  Thomas Marsden went to visit him at New Jersey in September 1851.  Thomas Marsden, a farmer, was living at Centerville, Allegany, in the 1860 Census, aged 54 with his wife, Elizabeth Marsden, aged 59.  Thomas Marsden and his wife were living at Centerville, Allegany, New York State in the 1870 Census, a farmer aged 64 and 69 respectively, both born in Wales.  Thomas Marsden is recorded at Centerville in Child’s Gazetteer and Business Directory of Allegany County, N.Y. of 1875, as a farmer of 16 acres.  Thomas Marsden, a farmer aged 73, and his wife, Elizabeth Marsden, aged 79, were living at Centerville in the 1880 Census.[14]  They are not listed in the 1900 US Census.  Thomas and Elizabeth Marsden were the parents of:

 

i. MARY MARSDEN, born ca 1831 in Wales and was aged 19 in the 1850 US Census, where it is claimed she was born in New York.  The Rev. Thomas Picton said in a letter of 1858 that she was married, and lived in Saginaw Bay, Michigan.

 

ii. GODFREY MARSDEN, bapt. 3 March 1833 at Whitechurch in Wales and a farmer, aged 17, in the 1850 US Census.  He was living with his parents in the 1860 US Census, aged 26.  Godfrey Marsden was living at Chesaning, Saginaw, Michigan, in the 1870 Census, a worker in a sawmill, aged 37, with his wife, Sarah J. Marsden, and children Frank Marsden, aged 3 and Effie Marsden, aged 1 month.  This would seem to be following in the path of his elder sister.  He was living at the same place in the 1880 Census, aged 49, with his wife, Sarah J. Marsden, aged 38 and their children.  Godfrey Marsden is not recorded in the 1900 US Census.  It would be worth checking if his wife was living at the time of the 1900 US Census.  Godfrey and Sarah Marsden were the parents of:

 

a. FRANK ARNOLD MARSDEN, born 3 May 1866 at Saginaw, MIchigan.  He was living with his parents in the 1870 census, aged 3.  He was living with his parents in the 1880 Census, aged 13.  Frank A. Marsden died on 3 June 1933 at Stockton.

 

b. ALENIA (?) H. MARSDEN, born ca 1871.  She was living with her parents in the 1880 Census, aged 9.

 

c. ALICE L. MARSDEN, born ca 1872.  She was living with her parents in the 1880 Census, aged 8.

 

d. WILLIAM MARSDEN, born ca 1874.  He was living with his parents in the 1880 Census, aged 6.

 

e. THOMAS MARSDEN, born ca 1878.  He was living with his parents in the 1880 Census, aged 2.

 

iii. MARGARET MARSDEN, bapt. 29 March 1835 at Whitechurch, and aged 15 in the 1850 US Census.  She was a regular correspondent with her grandfather, the Rev. Thomas Picton, according to a letter written by him in 1858.  She was not recorded in the 1860 US Census, so she may have married by this date.

 

iv. WILLIAM MARSDEN, bapt. 14 June 1837 at Whitechurch, and aged 13 in the 1850 US Census.  William Marsden, a carpenter and joiner, aged 23, was living at China, Wyoming, New York, in the 1860 Census, with Mary Marsden, aged 18, and Josephine Marsden, aged 16, both house servants.  William Marsden was living at Olyphant Blakely township, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, in the 1870 Census, a coal miner, aged 33, born in Wales, with his wife, Margaret Marsden, aged 34, born in Wales, and their three children.  He does not appear to be listed in the 1900 Census of America.  William and Margaret Marsden were the parents of:

 

a. ELIZABETH MARSDEN, born ca 1863 in Pennsylvania, and living with her parents in the 1870 Census, aged 7.

 

b. MARY MARSDEN, born ca 1864 and living with her parents in the 1870 Census, aged 6.

 

c. THOMAS MARSDEN, born ca 1865 and living with his parents in the 1870 Census, aged 5.

 

v. THOMAS MARSDEN, bapt. 25 August 1839 at Whitechurch.  He was not recorded in the 1850 Census of Centerville as living with his parents.

 

b.    MARY MARSDEN, bapt. 16 October 1809 at Whitechurch parish church.  David Jones of Haverfordwest, bachelor, married Mary Marsden at Whitechurch on 19 March 1831 [Witnesses: (?)].  A David and Jane Milsom Jones had a son named George Picton Jones, bapt. 12 May 1850, born at St. Dogmells.

 

iv.          ANN(E) PICTON, born 1782/3 at Eglwyswrw, according to the 1861 Census.  She married David Davies of Tyllwyd in the parish of Meline on 17 June 1803 at Whitechurch parish church [Witnesses: (?)].  David Davies was co-lessee of Dyffryn Pedryn [Pwdrin] along with his wife's cousin, Owen Picton of Trelech, in 1818.  Anne Davies was living at Llaindilyn in 1851, according to her brother, the Rev. Thomas Picton, in a letter written in that year.  David Davies was not living at Tyllwyd in the Tithe Schedule drawn up for the parish of Meline in 1838.  David Davies, Ind(ependent), aged ‘60’, was living with Stephen Picton, a draper in Conwil village, aged ‘20’, together with his younger sister, Martha Picton, aged 15, in the 1841 Census Return [HO 107/1383/7/57].  Also living there was a Mary Thomas, aged ‘20’.

 

There were los of families whose Head of Household in the 1841 Census of Llanfyrnach was David Davies.  These families include: (a) Nantgyfn fawr: David Davies, aged ‘50’, farmer, not born in Carmarthenshire; Thomas Davies, 11, born in Carmarthenshire; Elizabeth Davies, 9, born in Carmarthenshire and David Davies, 6, born in Carmarthenshire [HO 107/ /19/4]; (b) Pantywen: David Davies, aged ‘50’, farmer, not born in Carmarthenshire; Esther Davies, aged ‘50’, born in Carmarthenshire; Benjamin Davies, aged ‘25’, carpenter, born in Carmarthenshire; Phoebe Davies, 12, born in Carmarthenshire; Thomas Davies, 9, born in Carmarthenshire; Catherine Davies, 6, born in Carmarthenshire [HO 107/ /19/5]; (c) Llaindelyn: Daniel Davies, 64, farmer, not born in Carmarthenshire; Ann Davies, 65, born in Carmarthenshire; Elizabeth Davies, 30, born in Carmarthenshire; Phoebe Davies, 27, born in Carmarthenshire; John Davies, 10, born in Carmarthenshire [HO 107/ /19/23].

 

A David Davies of Llanfyrnach left a will in 1852 [SD 1852/211].  There was also a David Davies of Llanboidy, who left a will in 1844 [SD 1844/21].  In the 1851 Census Llaindelyn in the parish of Llanfyrnach was occupied by Daniel Davies, aged 73, a farmer of 33 acres, born at Llandewi in Carmarthenshire [HO 107/2482/62].  His wife, Anne Davies, was aged 69, born at Eglwyswrw.  Daniel Davies of Llanfyrnach left a will, dated 1852 [SD 1852/144].  Anne Davies was living in 1858, and in communication by letter with her brother, the Rev. Thomas Picton of Hoboken, New Jersey.  Anne Davies was living at Llaindelyn in the parish of Llanfyrnach in the 1861 Census, aged 79, a farmer holding 32 acres, born at Eglwyswrw [RG 9/4181/39].  The Chapel of Rhydyparc in Eglwys Fair-a-Churig was associated with Glandwr Chapel in the parish of Llanfyrnach and Capel-y-Graig in the parish of Trelech.  A search now needs to be made for the family in the 1841 and 1851 Census Returns for Llanfyrnach or Eglwys Fair-a-Churig.  James Evans of Fron Isaf was the Deacon at Rhydyparc Chapel in 1851.[15]

 

An Anne Davies died in 1868, aged 84 [Carmarthen, March 1868, 11a 464], and there are five other deaths of an Anne Davies in the Carmarthen Registration District between March 1863 and September 1865 – but no ages are given in the Death Index Registers until March 1866.  David and Anne Davies were the parents of:

 

a.     DANIEL DAVIES of Pantygelly Farm, Eglwys Fair-a-Churig, Co. Carmarthen (see PICTON EVANS family).  In the 1871 Census Pantyelly Farm was occupied by Thomas Richards and family.  He was aged 50, a farmer, born at Llanwinio.  Pantygelly Farm was occupied by Titus Davies and family, he was aged 28, a labourer on the Taff Vale Railway, born at Llandissilio, Pembs. [RG 10/5505/79].

 

b.    ELIZABETH DAVIES, born 1805/6 at Llanfyrnach.  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, aged 44 [HO 107/2482/62], and with her mother in the 1861 Census, aged 55 [RG 9/4181/39].

 

c.    JOHN DAVIES, born 1822/3 at Eglwysfair [a Churig], Carmarthenshire.  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 28 [HO 107/2482/62] and with his mother in the 1861 Census, aged 38 [RG 9/4181/39].

 

b.  RACHEL PICTON, bapt. 14 June 1747 at Whitechurch.  Stephen Morris of Whitechurch left a will in 1725 [SD 1725/38]; Evan Morris of Whitechurch left a will in 1750 [SD 1750/15]; Morris Morris of Whitechurch left a will in 1768 [SD 1768/72]; John Morris of Whitechurch left a will in 1776 [SD 1776/24]; Stephen Morris of Whitechurch left a will, dated 30 August 1825 and proved on 24 January 1826 [SD 1826/38].  Stephen Maurice of Whitechurch left a will in 1783 [SD 1783/].  Rachel Picton married ----- Morris, and was to receive £16 : 16s under the will of her father, John Picton (1789).  The place and date of the wedding and her husband’s Christian name have yet to be established, but the wedding probably took place at Whitechurch, where the parish marriage register is missing from 1759 to 1799.  Stephen Morris is the best prospect and his will should be obtained.  The burial of Rachel Morris should be searched for in the various Whitechurch registers.  A Stephen Morris married Mary Thomas on 24 November 1808 at Whitechurch.  Stephen and Mary Morris are recorded at Whitechurch in the 1841 Census [HO 107/1448/28/9].  He was a farmer, aged 75, and she was aged 70.  Also living with them was Martha Morris, a servant aged 15.  John Thomas, widower, and Mary Morris, widow, were married by banns at Whitechurch on 23 July 1825 [Witnesses: John Morris, John Rees].

 

c.  THOMAS PICTON, farmer, bapt. 2 December 1749 at Whitechurch.  He was to succeed to his father's property at Tyrbwlch after the death of his mother, according to his father’s will (1789).  He was a witness to the marriage of William Rowlands of Bayvil, Gent., and Diana James on 13 February 1796 at Whitechurch.  He married Anne Morris [born 1751], but the place and date of their marriage has yet to be established, but probably took place at Whitechurch.  The Morris families of Whitechurch seem to have had a long history of connections with the Picton family, and some of their wills could be worth examining.  Thomas and Anne Picton worked the farm and land at Ty’r bwlch, and were helped by their sons, Thomas Picton and John Picton.  In the Land Tax Return for Whitechurch, dated 7 July 1804, Thomas Picton was the occupier at Ty’r bwlch.  There was no listing for Tycanol or Coedcenlas Uchaf in this Return.  In 1814 Thomas Picton was the occupier of Ty’r bwlch and the owner was ‘the executors of James Bowen’.

 

Because Thomas Picton is described in the baptismal entry of his son, Thomas Picton, in September 1785 as of Llanvair, it would be worth examining the very earliest Land Tax entries for Llanfair Nantgwyn to see if Thomas Picton was living there.  By 1787 the baptismal entry for the next son, also Thomas Picton, he was described as living at Tir Bwll [= Ty’r bwlch] in the parish of Whitechurch.

 

James Bowen, Esq., of Whitechurch House was buried at Whitechurch on 17 March 1814, aged 75 [born 1738/9].  He left a will, proved in the St. Davids Archdeaconary in 1814 [SD 1814/266].  His daughter, Elizabeth Bowen of Whitechurch House, was buried at Whitechurch on 22 October 1844, aged 73.  In the 1851 Census of Whitechurch, Frances Bowen was the head of the Household, aged 70, a farmer of 219 acres, born at Whitechurch.  Also living with her were sisters Margaret Bowen, aged 68, and Joyce Bowen, aged 67 [HO 107/2481/213].  His daughter, Margaret Bowen, spinster of Whitechurch House, was buried at Whitechurch on 6 December 1854, aged 76, and left a will proved in 1855 [SD 1855/172].  Miss Joyce Bowen, aged 68, of Whitechurch House, was buried at Whitechurch on 4 September 1856 and left a will, proved in 1856 [SD 1856/235].  James Bowen owned a number of properties in Whitechurch in the earliest surviving Land Tax Return for Whitechurch (1786).  There was also a James Bowen, who owned two farms in the parish of Eglwyswrw at the time the Tithe Schedule was compiled in 1838, with areas of 157 acres and 118 acres approximately.

 

Thomas Picton, the son, had left home and moved to Bridell by 1829, but John Picton was still at Tycanol in 1839.  Thomas Picton, the elder, is recorded as the occupier at Ty’r bwlch in the 1831 Land Tax Return, when Miss Elizabeth Bowen was the owner of the farm.  Thomas Picton was a witness to the marriage of his eldest son, Owen Picton, in 1805 at Meline, and to the marriage of John Davies and Lydia Lewis on 4 July 1811 at Whitechurch.  Thomas Picton of Ty’r bwlch died on 12 March 1836 at Whitechurch, when he would have been about 86 years of age [RG 4/3773].  The Tithe Map for Whitechurch is in the TNA under reference IR 30/54/136 and the accompanying Schedule under IR 29/54/136.  Anne Picton, the widow of Thomas Picton, died on 15 February 1846 at Maesgwyn Farm in the parish of Whitechurch, aged 95, indicating that she was not living at Bridell with her son, Thomas Picton, but with John Picton, who then farmed at Maesgwyn [Cardigan, March 1846, 27 33].  Thomas and Ann Picton were the parents of:

 

i.          OWEN PICTON, born ca 1780/1 at Whitechurch.  His baptism entry is probably missing from the Penygroes Chapel register at this date.  Owen Picton was described as from Whitechurch, when he married Mary Davies [born ca 1790/1 at either Meline or Pembroke] on 14 November 1805 at Meline [Witnesses: David Davies, Thomas Picton (presumably his father) and John Davies].  Mary Davies was probably a sister of David Davies of Tyllwyd, Meline.  Owen Picton was a co-lessee with his cousin, David Davies of Tyllwyd, Meline, both farmers, of Dyffryn Pedryn [Pwdrin] in Llanboidy, from Mary Lloyd of Bronwydd, on 25 June 1818 [Bronwydd MSS II, No. 1879].  There is also a list of bidders for the lease, with a note of the letting of the same to Owen Picton on the same date [Bronwydd MSS II, No. 1875].  David Davies, clerk, curate of Meline, bachelor, married Esther Lloyd, spinster, by licence on 7 March 1822.  His nephew, Jacob Picton, was farming at Dyffryn Pedryn [Pwdrin] in 1822-1824 in Cwmfelin Mynach in the parish of Llanboidy.

 

Owen Picton migrated from Whitechurch and must have moved on from the farm at Duffryn Pwdryn fairly quickly also, as he was living at Glanrhyd farm in the parish of Trelech, Carmarthenshire, in the 1841 Census, a farmer aged ‘60’ [HO 107/1383/23/18] with his wife, Mary Picton, aged ‘55’ and 4 children.  In the 1851 Census Owen Picton was a farmer of 150 acres, aged 70, with his wife, Mary Picton, aged 60 [HO 107/2474/237].  The Land Tax returns for Trelech from 1817 to 1831 at the Carmarthen Record Office would establish when the family settled in that parish.  Letters survive written from his cousin, the Rev. Thomas Picton of New Jersey, to Owen Picton of Glanrhyd, Trelech, between 1845 and 1858 [Carmarthen Record Office, ACC 4199-4204].  The NLW also has a letter in the Glyn Picton MSS from West Point Military Academy, written on 6 February 1975, saying “Several years ago the library obtained copies and translations of letters written by Thomas Picton whilst at West Point.  They provide a fine description of West Point and his work here”.  It is essential to obtain confirmation as to who exactly deposited these letters at the Carmarthen Record Office.  Perhaps this means the letters at Carmarthen are copies of the transcripts and the originals are either at West Point, or still held somewhere in the USA; or the West Point letters are a completely different set of letters.  The only clue is that they were typescripts of the original letters and given by Mrs. Williams of Mount Pleasant, Llangynin, in 1956.  She will have to be located in a contemporary Electoral Roll.

 

Owen Picton was living at Glanrhyd farm, Trelech a’r Bettws, a farmer of 140 acres employing 3 labourers in the 1861 Census, aged 80, born at Whitechurch [RG 9/4144/68].  Also living with him was his wife, Mary Picton, aged 76, born at Meline, and their son, William Picton [aged 33], their daughter Ann Picton [aged 38], and his grand-daughter, Ann Picton [aged 3].  Owen Picton died on 8 March 1864 at Glanrhyd, when he would have been aged about 83 [Carmarthen, March 1864, 11a 513].  He left a will, proved at London on 24 May 1864 by his widow, Mary Picton, widow and sole executrix.  The value of his estate was given as under £200, which seems remarkably low for a lifetime of service as a tenant farmer.  Mary Picton was living at Quay in the parish of Trelech a’r Bettws in the 1871 Census, a widow and annuitant aged 86, born at Meline [RG 10/5503/53].  She must be the Mary Picton who died in 1872, aged 87 [Carmarthen, June 1872, 11a 506].  Owen and Mary Picton were the parents of:

 

a.     THOMAS PICTON, born 8 February 1806 at Tyllwyd, Pontcynon, Pembrokeshire, and bapt. 9 March 1806 at Meline parish church.  He became a farmer at Trelech a'r Bettws, and occupied the farm of Cilhir Uchaf.  Thomas Picton married Maria Howells [born 15 September 1805] on 14 July 1836 at Capel-y-Graig, Trelech [Witnesses: Thomas Rogers and Stephen Picton].  Thomas Picton was living at Cilhir Uchaf, Trelech, in the 1841 Census, a farmer aged ‘35’, with his wife, Maria Picton, aged ‘25’, and 2 female servants [HO 107/1383/23/46].  Maria Picton died on 6 October 1849 and was buried at Trelech a'r Bettws on 9 October 1849, aged 35 [Carmarthen, December 1849, 26 401].  Thomas Picton was a widower, aged 45, and a farmer of 218 acres at Cilhir Uchaf, Trelech, employing 2 labourers, at the time of the 1851 Census [HO 107/2474/270].  It would be interesting to establish when Thomas Picton moved from Trelech to Llanvihangel Abercowin, and from there to farm at Cilhir Uchaf in Trelech.  This would require purchasing the birth certificate of his son, David Picton, in the first instance, to help establish where the family was living between 1837 and 1841 [Check also the Tithe Map for Trelech].

 

Thomas Picton a farmer and widower of Cilhir Uchaf, aged 46, remarried to Esther Jones, a spinster and daughter of John Jones, a farmer of Dinas, Abernant, aged 26, on 25 November 1852 at Peterwell [Fynnonbedr] Independent Chapel, Trelech [Witnesses: David Jones, Evan Jones and Joseph Lewis; Carmarthen, December 1852, 11a 940].  Was he the same John Jones, who witnessed the marriage of David Evans and Anne Bowen at Capel-y-Graig, Trelech, in 1847?  The marriage certificate confirms that Owen Picton was his father.  Thomas and Esther Picton were living at Cilhir Uchaf in the 1861 Census.  He was a farmer of 200 acres, aged 55, born at Meline, and Esther Picton was aged 32, born at Llanpumpsaint [RG 9/4145/20].  The family cannot be traced as yet in the 1871 Census.

 

Thomas Picton of Clihir farm, Trelech, died on 24 July 1880, aged 74, and was buried at Trelech a'r Bettws church [Carmarthen, September 1880, 11a 456].  He left a will which was proved by his widow, Esther Picton of Cilhir Uchaf and his son, Phillip Picton.  Esther Picton, a widow, was at the head of the 200 acre farm of Cilhir Uchaf in the 1881 Census, aged 51, born at Conwil [RG 11/5401/49].  Esther Picton died on 9 March 1890 at Mydrim village, Mydrim, aged 59 [Carmarthen, March 1890, 11a 755].  She left a will, which was proved on 9 June 1890 by David Evans of Pleasant View, Mydrim, a carpenter, one of the executors.  Thomas and Maria Picton were the parents of:

 

i. JOHN PICTON, born 28 March 1837 at Talfan Farm in the parish of Llanvihangel Abercowin.  He was baptised at Bethlehem Independent Chapel at St. Clears on 28 June 1837.  John Picton was living with his parents at Trelech in the 1841 Census, aged 4 [HO 107/1383/23/46].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census at Trelech, aged 13 [HO 107/2474/270] and in the 1861 Census, aged 23 [RG 9/4145/20].  John Picton married Phoebe Phillips of Penallt Trawscoed, Abernant, on 23 March 1869 at Abernant parish church [Witnesses: Phillip Picton and Lydia Phillip(s); Carmarthen, March 1869, 11a 791].  The family cannot be traced in the 1871 Census as yet.  John Picton was living at Pant To Farm in the parish of Llanvihangel ar Arth, in the 1881 Census, aged 44, born at St. Clears, with his wife, Phoebe Picton, aged 36, born at Clydey [RG 11/5435/31].  Phoebe Picton must be the daughter of Caleb Phillips of Abernant, aged 76, a farmer, in the 1891 Census and living at Penyrallt Trawscoed, Abernant [RG 12/4519/83].  The Tithe Schedule for Llanvihangel Abercowin is IR 29/47/41 and the Map is IR 30/47/41.  Llanginning is IR 29/47/52 and Trelech is IR 29/47/82.  Llanfihangel ar Arth is IR 29/47/42.

 

John Picton of Panto in the parish of Llanvihangel a’r Arth, farmer, died on 24 September 1885, aged 48 [Newcastle Emlyn, September 1885, 11b 21].  Administration of his estate was granted to his widow, Phoebe Picton, on 3 June 1886.  The value of his estate was £186:16s.  In the 1891 Census Phoebe Picton was living at Pant To Farm, Llanvihangel ar Arth, a widow aged 47, born at Abernant [RG 12/4550/30].  Phoebe Picton was living at Panto, Llanvihangel ar Arth, in the 1901 Census, a widow aged 56, and a farmer, born at Clydey [RG 13/5142/25].  Phoebe Picton died on 30 November 1912, aged 68 [Newcastle Emlyn, December 1912, 11b 31].  Administration of her effects was granted to Thomas Picton, farmer, on 15 January 1913.  The value of her estate was £463:19s:5d.  It is not immediately clear who this Thomas Picton would be.  John and Phoebe Picton were the parents of:

 

a. CALEB THOMAS PICTON, born 1870 at Abernant [Carmarthen, March 1870, 11a 751].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 11 [RG 11/5435/31].  He was living with his mother in the 1891 Census, aged 21 [RG 12/4550/30].  Caleb Picton was living at Panto, Llanvihangel ar Arth, in the 1901 Census, aged 31 [RG 13/5142/25].  He never married, and lived at Panto farm until he became too old to manage it, and he sold the farm to the local Baptist Minister.

 

b. RACHEL PICTON, born 1872 at Abernant [Carmarthen, June 1872, 11a 778].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 9 [RG 11/5435/31].  She was living with her mother in the 1891 Census, aged 19 [RG 12/4550/30].  Rachel Picton was living at Panto, Llanvihangel ar Arth in the 1901 Census, aged 28 [RG 13/5142/25].  Rachel Picton died in 1904, aged 30 [Newcastle Emlyn, March 1904, 11b 19].

 

c. DAVID PICTON, born 1875 at Conwil [Carmarthen, March 1875, 11a 936].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 6 [RG 11/5435/31].  He was living with his grandfather, Caleb Phillips, at Penyrallt Trawscoed farm, Abernant, in the 1891 Census, aged 16, a farmer’s son [RG 12/4519/83].  David Picton was living at Penrallt Trawscoed, Abernant, in the 1901 Census, a general farm servant, aged 26 [RG 13/5115/83] with his aunt, Lydia Phillips, aged 42, a farmer.  David Picton married Rosamond Esther Phillips of Ty Mawr farm, Boncath [born 1879] in 1903 [Cardigan, December 1903, 11b 20].  They were very strong Baptist Chapel members and at one time were members of Moriah Baptist Chapel, Pencader.

 

They lived for some time at Pant To farm and then moved to a couple of other farms in the area.  Later the family moved to Meidrim, and then eventually moved back to Ty Mawr farm, Boncath, where Rosamund Phillips/Picton had been born.  This farm is still owned and worked by a Picton descendant.  David and Rosamond Picton are buried at Blaenffos Baptist Chapel.  David and Rosamond Picton were the parents of:

 

i.

 

d. LYDIA PICTON, born 1879 at Llanllawddog or Llanvihangel [Carmarthen, December 1879, 11a 781].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 1 [RG 11/5435/31].  She was living with her mother in the 1891 Census, a scholar aged 12 [RG 12/4550/30].  Lydia Picton was living at Panto, Llanvihangel ar Arth in the 1901 Census, aged 21 [RG 13/5142/25].  Lydia Picton married in 1904 to either Evan Jones or Stephen Thomas [Carmarthen, September 1904, 11a 1845].  She had at least one son;

 

i. IEUAN ----- , born 1913.  He was living at Carmarthen in December 2004, unmarried, aged 91.

 

e. MARY ANNE PICTON, born 1883 at Llanvihangel [Newcastle Emlyn, December 1883, 11b 22].  She was living with her mother in the 1891 Census, aged 7 [RG 12/4550/30].  Mary Picton was living at Panto, Llanvihangel ar Arth in the 1901 Census, aged 17 [RG 13/5142/25].

 

ii. DAVID PICTON, born 1838 [Carmarthen, December 1838, 26 447].  David Picton was living at Trelech with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 2 [HO 107/1383/23/46].  He was living with his father in the 1851 Census, aged 11 [HO 107/2474/270].  He was buried at Trelech a'r Bettws on 9 July 1859, aged 21 [Carmarthen, September 1859, 11a 365].

 

iii. OWEN PICTON, born 1841 at Trelech [Carmarthen, September 1841, 26 487].  He was living with his father in the 1851 Census, aged 9 [HO 107/2474/270].  Owen Picton of Cilhir Ucha died on 15 October 1851, aged 11, and was buried at Trelech a’r Bettws on 18 October 1851 [Carmarthen, December 1851, 26 411].

 

iv. STEPHEN PICTON, born 1842/3 [check entries under Pickton].  Stephen Picton of Cilhir Ucha died on 28 July 1848 and was buried at Trelech a’r Bettws on 31 July 1848, aged 5 [Carmarthen, September 1848, 26 350].

 

v. PHILLIP PICTON, born 1846 at Trelech [Carmarthen, June 1846, 26 583].  He was living with his father in the 1851 Census, aged 4 [HO 107/2474/270].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, a scholar aged 15 [RG 9/4145/20].  He was a witness at the wedding of his elder brother, John Picton, in 1869.  He cannot be traced in the 1871 Census.  Phillip Picton was living with his step-mother, Esther Picton, at Cilhir Uchaf in the 1881 Census, aged 35 born at Trelech [RG 11/5401/49].  Phillip Picton was living at Hen Felin farm when he died on 8 January 1888, aged 41, and was buried at Trelech a’r Bettws on 11 January 1888 [Carmarthen, March 1888, 11a 617].  He left a will which was proved by William Picton of Plasparcau farm, farmer, his uncle; the Rev. Lewis Williams of the vicarage, Trelech a’r Bettws and Esther Picton of Pantygwr in the said parish, widow.  The value of his estate was £224:4s.

 

vi. THOMAS PICTON, born 1848 at Trelech [Carmarthen, December 1848, 26 535].  He was living with his father in the 1851 Census, aged 2 [HO 107/2474/270].  Thomas Picton of Cilhir Ucha died on 7 August 1852, and was buried at Trelech a’r Bettws on 10 August 1852, aged 4 [Carmarthen, September 1852, 11a 325].

 

vii. MARY PICTON, born 1853 at Trelech [Carmarthen, March 1853, 11a 514].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, a scholar aged 7 [RG 9/4145/20].  She was living at Cilhir Uchaf in the 1881 Census, aged 27 [RG 11/5401/49].  Mary Picton married Samuel Thomas in 1887 [Carmarthen, September 1887, 11a 1155].  Samuel and Mary Thomas were living at Green Park Farm in the parish of Merthyr, Carmarthenshire, in the 1891 Census.  Samuel Thomas was aged 42, born at Abernant and Mary Thomas was aged 37, born at Trelech [RG 12/4519/68].  They were living with his parents on the farm.  Samuel and Mary Thomas were still living at Green Park Farm in the parish of Merthyr in the 1901 Census, aged 52 and 48 respectively [RG 13/5115/66].

 

viii. RACHEL PICTON, born 1858 at Trelech [Carmarthen, March 1858, 11a 621].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 3 [RG 9/4145/20].  She cannot be traced in the 1871 Census.  She is probably the Rachel Picton, who married in 1880 to David Morris [Carmarthen, December 1880, 11a 1179].  David and Rachel Morris were lving at Pandygwr in the parish of Trelech in the 1881 Census, aged 21 and 23 respectively; David Morris was a farmer of 57 acres, born at Mydrim [RG 11/5401/55].  David and Rachel Morris were the parents of:

 

a. THOMAS PICTON MORRIS, born 1881 at Trelech.  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 1 month [RG 11/5401/55].

 

ix. EDWARD PICTON, born 1862 at Trelech [Carmarthen, December 1862, 11a 595].  Edward Picton of Cilhir ucha, Trelech, was buried at Trelech on 11 December 1869, aged 8 [Carmarthen, December 1869, 11a 451].

 

b.     ELEANOR PICTON, born 23 February 1808 at Glanrhyd and bapt. 13 March 1808 at Trelech parish church.  Her baptism is not recorded in the Bishop’s Transcripts of Meline.  She married William Davies of Trelech, a shopkeeper, on 5 July 1825 at Trelech a’r Bettws church [Witnesses: John Davies, Mary Davies].  They were living at Waterloo House in the parish of Trelech in the 1841 and 1851 Census Returns [HO 107/1383/23/28 and HO 107/2474/249].  William Davies was a shopkeeper, aged ‘35’ in 1841 and aged 47 in 1851, born at Trelech.  It would be useful to know if he was related to David Davies, who helped Owen and Jacob Picton acquire the lease of Dyffryn Pwdrin farm in 1818.

 

William and Eleanor Davies had moved from Trelech by 1861 and were living at the farm of Morlogws Uchaf in the parish of Kilrhedyn, Cardiganshire, in the 1861 Census [RG 9/4180/69] and the 1871 Census [RG 10/5544/38].  William Davies was a farmer of 100 acres, aged 68, born at Trelech a’r Bettws and Eleanor Davies was aged 63, born at Trelech a’r Bettws, in the 1871 Census.  William and Eleanor Davies were living at Morlogws Uchaf, Kilrhedyn, in the 1881 Census, aged 77 and 73 respectively, both born at Trelech [RG 11/5431/69].  Eleanor Davies was not obviously to be seen in the 1891 Census for Wales, and there are several death entries for an Eleanor Davies in the Newcastle Emlyn Registration District between 1881 and 1891, but none of them has exactly the correct age, based on the date of her baptism.  This also fits with the fact that their son, Stephen Davies, was the farmer at Morlogws Uchaf in the 1891 Census.  William and Eleanor Davies were the parents of:

 

i. DAVID DAVIES, born 29 April 1827 at Rock Chapel, Trelech.  Rock Chapel is known as Capel y Graig in Welsh.  He was not living with his parents in the 1841 or 1851 Census Returns for Trelech.

 

ii. MARY DAVIES, born 10 March 1829 at Rock Chapel, Trelech.  She was living at Trelech with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged 12 [HO 107/1383/23/28].  She was not living with her parents in the 1851 Census.

 

iii. FRANCES DAVIES, born 26 February 1831 at Rock Chapel, Trelech.  She was not living with her parents in the 1841 or 1851 Census Returns for Trelech.

 

iv. ANN(E) DAVIES, born 29 July 1834 at Rock Chapel, Trelech.  She was living at Trelech with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged 6 [HO 107/1383/23/28].  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, aged 17, employed ‘in the house’ [HO 107/2474/249].

 

v. WILLIAM PICTON DAVIES, born 1836/7 at Trelech.  He was living at Trelech with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 4 [HO 107/1383/23/28].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 14, employed ‘in the shop’ [HO 107/2474/249].  He was a draper, grocer and a farmer of 8 acres, living at Waterloo House in the 1861 Census of Trelech, aged 23, unmarried [RG 9/4145/8].[16]  William Picton Davies married Eliza Thomas and they were living at Waterloo House, Trelech, in the 1871 Census, both aged 33, with their mother-in-law, Catherine Thomas, aged 70 [RG 10/5503/53].  Waterloo House is situated directly opposite the Chapel at Trelech.  William Picton Davies was a draper, holding 9 acres and employing one boy.  They were living at Trelech also in the 1881 Census [RG 11/5401/35] and 1891 Census Return, when they were both aged 54 [RG 12/4520/49].  William Picton Davies was a draper, grocer and wine dealer at Waterloo House.  In the 1901 Census they were living at 50 King Street, Carmarthen.  William P. Davies was a stationer and bookseller, aged 64, born at Trelech and Eliza Davies was aged 64, born at St. Clears [RG 13/5112/51].

 

vi. MARGARET DAVIES, born 17 August 1839 at Trelech.  She was living at Trelech with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged 1 [HO 107/1383/23/28].  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, a scholar aged 12 [HO 107/2474/249].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census at Cilrhedyn, a house keeper aged 21 [RG 9/4180/69].  She married James Bowen on 20 February 1864 at Newcastle Emlyn Register Office.  James and Margaret Bowen were living at Plasparke, Trelech, in the 1871 Census, aged 34 and 32 respectively [RG 10/5503/38].  James Bowen was a farmer of 100 acres, employing 2 men.  Did he take over the farm from John Bowen, who was farming Plasparke in 1851?

 

James Bowen was the son of William Bowen, a farmer of 300 acres, aged 55, and he was aged 30 in the 1861 Census.  He was living with his father, William Bowen, and his mother, Sarah Bowen, at Blaensulgen in the parish of Kildrhedin [Cilrhedyn], Carmarthenshire [RG 9/4180/65].  William Bowen was born at Llanfyrnach in Pembrokeshire, as was his son, James Bowen, and Sarah Bowen was born at Penboyer in Carmarthenshire.  They also had a daughter, Mary Bowen, aged 28 in 1861, who had married James Nicholas.  She was also born at Llanfyrnach, and James Nicholas was aged 39, a carter, born at Trelech.[17]  They also had their four children living with them.  Also living with them in the 1871 Census were two maids and Phoebe Bowen, aged 28, a farmer’s widow, born at Trelech.  Phoebe Bowen must be the widow of John Picton [RG 10/5503/38].  Margaret Bowen died on 8 August 1871 at Plasparch Uchaf, Trelech, aged 32 [Carmarthen, September 1871, 11a 418].  Her husband, James Bowen remarried to either Amy Griffiths or Mary Rees [Carmarthen, March 1873, 11a 966].

 

Another James Bowen was living at Plaspark Uchaf in the parish of Trelech in the 1881 Census, aged 48, born at Trelech [RG 11/5401/24].  Also living with him was his wife, Frances Bowen, aged 38, born at Trelech.  James and Frances Bowen were the parents of Elizabeth Bowen, aged 15; Sophia Bowen, aged 12; Anne Bowen, aged 10; Thomas Bowen, aged 9; Mary Bowen, aged 6; Frances Bowen, aged 4 and Anna Bowen, aged 2.  In the 1871 Census James and Frances Bowen were living at Drewrdau Uchaf Farm in the parish of Trelech.  He was a farmer of 32 acres, aged 38, born at Trelech, and she was aged 28, born at KIlrhedyn [RG 10/5503/58].  Also living with them were their children Sarah Bowen, aged 6; Elizabeth Bowen, aged 5; Sophia Bowen, aged 2 and Anne Bowen, aged 10 months.  James and Margaret Davies were the parents of:

 

a.    SARAH BOWEN, born 1867 at Trelech [Newcastle Emlyn, September 1867, 11b 19].

 

b. WILLIAM BOWEN, born 1868 at Trelech [Carmarthen, March 1868, 11a 722].

 

c. OWEN BOWEN, born 11 October 1869 at Ffynonwen, Trelech.  He married Matilda Morgans in 1897 [Pontyprydd, December 1897, 11a 877].  Their children included Trefor Bowen, born 28 October 1912 at Porth, Rhondda Valley.  Trefor Bowen married Blodwen Menna Jones, 24 April 1943 at Albany Road Baptist Church, Cardiff.  They had a son, John Grattan Bowen, born 19xx, who was the father of Kimberley Bowen [born 1973], now living at Watford [2005].

 

vii. JOHN DAVIES, born ca 1842/3 at Trelech.  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 10 [HO 107/2474/249].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 18 [RG 9/4180/69].

 

viii. OWEN DAVIES, born 1844 at Trelech [Carmarthen, December 1844, 26 507].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 7 [HO 107/2474/249].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 16 [RG 9/4180/69].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 28 [RG 10/5544/38].

 

ix. STEPHEN DAVIES, born 1849 at Trelech [Carmarthen, June 1849, 26 643].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 2 [HO 107/2474/249].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 13 [RG 9/4180/69].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 23 [RG 10/5544/38].  Stephen Davies married Anna Williams in 1872 [Newcastle Emlyn, September 1872, 11b 37].  Stephen Davies was living at Waunffynnonau in the parish of Pembrey in the 1881 Census, a farmer of 60 acres, aged 32, born at Trelech [RG 11/5376/106].  Also living with him was his wife, Anna Davies, aged 29, born at Kilrhedyn.  Stephen Davies was living at Morlogws Uchaf, Kilrhedyn, in the 1891 Census, a widower and farmer aged 43, born at Trelech [RG 12/4547/35].  He obviously had taken over this farm from his parents around 1884.  Stephen Davies was living at Morlogws Uchaf in the 1901 Census, a farmer and widower aged 52, born at Trelech [RG 13/5139/116].  He could be the Stephen Davies who died in 1901, aged 52 [Swansea, September 1901, 11a 562].  Stephen and Anna Davies were the parents of:

 

a. RACHEL DAVIES, born 1872/3 at Kilrhedyn.  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 8 [RG 11/5376/106].  She was living with her father in the 1891 Census, aged 18 [RG 12/4547/35].  She was living at Kilrhedyn with her father in the 1901 Census, aged 28 [RG 13/5139/116].

 

b. WILLIAM DAVIES, born 1874/5 at Kilrhedyn.  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 6 [RG 11/5376/106].  He was living with his father in the 1891 Census, aged 16 [RG 12/4547/35].  He was living at Kilrhedyn with his father in the 1901 Census, aged 26 [RG 13/5139/116].

 

c. ELEANOR DAVIES, born 1875/6 at Pembrey.  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 5 [RG 11/5376/106].  She was living with her father in the 1891 Census, aged 14 [RG 12/4547/35].

 

d. MARY DAVIES, born 1876/7 at Pembrey.  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 4 [RG 11/5376/106].  Mary Davies died in 1882, aged 5 [Llanelly, March 1882, 11a 498].

 

e. JONATHAN DAVIES, born 1881 at Pembrey and living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 1 month [RG 11/5376/106].  He is probably the Jonathan Davies who died in 1881, aged 0 [Llanelly, September 1881, 11a 365].

 

f. OWEN PICTON DAVIES, born 1882 at Pembrey [Llanelly, June 1882, 11a 827].  He was living with his father in the 1891 Census, aged 8 [RG 12/4547/35].  Owen Picton Davies was living at Carmarthen in the 1901 Census, aged 18, born at KIlrhedyn [RG 13/5113/31].  Owen Picton Davies married in 1906 [Swansea, March 1906, 11a 1201].  He died, possibly, in 1970.

 

g. MARGARET ANNE DAVIES, born 1884/5 at Kilrhedyn.  She was living with her father in the 1891 Census, aged 6 [RG 12/4547/35].  She was living at Kilrhedyn with her father in the 1901 Census, aged 16 [RG 13/5139/116].

 

x. THOMAS DAVIES, born ca 1852/3 at Trelech.  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 8 [RG 9/4180/69].  He is probably the Thomas Davies, a farm servant aged 18, on the farm of James Thomas at Trelech in the 1871 Census, aged 18, born at Trelech [RG 10/5503/59].  He is probably the Thomas Davies living at Plasnewydd in the parish of Abernant in the 1881 Census, a labouer aged 28, born at Trelech [RG 11/5400/88].  Also living with him was his wife, Hannah Davies, aged 35, born at Tremain, Cardiganshire.  Thomas and Hannah Davies were the parents of:

 

a. SARAH DAVIES, born 1875/6 at Treorchy.  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 5 [RG 11/5400/88].

 

b. JOHN DAVIES, born 1877/8 at Treorchy.  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 3 [RG 11/5400/88].

 

c. GRIFFITH DAVIES, born 1879/80 at Abernant.  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 1 [RG 11/5400/88].

 

c.     DAVID PICTON, born 1 April 1810 at Glanrhyd and bapt. 10 April 1810 at Rock Chapel [Capel-y-Graig], Trelech.  He married Mary Bowen on 30 October 1834 at Trelech [Witnesses: Thomas Picton (presumably his elder brother) and David Davies].  The Carmarthen Journal for 14 November 1834 records the marriage of D. Picton, son of Mr. Owen Picton of Glanrhyd, to Miss Mary Bowen, daughter of John Bowen of Plasparke.   David Picton was an agricultural labourer living at Plasparke ucha, Trelech a’r Bettws, in the 1841 Census, aged ‘30’ [HO 107/1383/23/17].  He and his wife, Mary Picton, aged ‘35’ were living on the farm of her father, John Bowen, aged 70, and his wife Elizabeth Bowen, aged 60.  There were clearly two people living in the parish of Trelech at this time with the name John Bowen, and they were father and son.  David and Mary Picton were living with John Bowen the elder.

 

There is the marriage of a John Bowen to Anne Jones on 6 December 1821 at Trelech, which looks probable for his son.  John Bowen (junior) was living at Cleanblewog Farm in the parish of Trelech in the 1841 Census, a farmer aged ‘40’ [HO 107/1383/23/].  Also living with him were his wife, Anne Bowen, aged ‘35’ and their children Anne Bowen, aged 13; Rachel Bowen, aged 11; Sarah Bowen, aged 9; Anna Bowen, aged 5 and Margaret Bowen, aged 2.  Also living with them were Elizabeth Thomas, aged 19 and her son John Thomas, aged 4 months; Sarah James, a female servant aged ‘25’ and Mary Davies, a female servant aged ‘15’.  This 1841 Census information implies that Anne Bowen was about 19/20 years of age on her marriage to David Evans on 6 July 1847, even though she is described as of “full age”.

 

In the 1851 Census a John Bowen was farming 215 acres at Plasparke, Trelech, a farmer aged 52, with his wife, Ann Bowen, aged 49, both born at Trelech, and employing 4 labourers [HO 107/2474/236].  Also living with them were their daughters Rachel Bowen, aged 20; Sarah Bowen, aged 18; Anna Bowen, aged 14 and Margaret Bowen, aged 12.  Another daughter was Anne Bowen, who married David Evans, a farmer of Pengwern in the parish of Kenarth [Cenarth], the son of James Evans, a farmer, on 6 July 1847 at Rock Chapel [Capel-y-Graig] at Trelech [Witnesses: John Bowen and John Jones].  Also living at Plasparke farm in the 1851 Census were Evan Pugh, a nephew aged 12, born at Llanybie; Thomas Bowen, a farm servant aged 24, born at Trelech; Edward James, a farm servant aged 29, born at Trelech; Stephen Bowen, a farm servant aged 14, born at Trelech and James Davies, a farm servant aged 12, born at Trelech.  They also employed a house sevant, Elizabeth Thomas, aged 19, born at Manordivy.  John Bowen married Ann Jones at Trelech on 6 December 1821.

 

Mary Picton died on 6 June 1847 at Sunny Hill, Llanboidy [Narberth, June 1847, 26 653] and this is confirmed by the 1851 Census, which shows David Picton was a widower, aged 40, farming 46 acres at Sunny Hill, Llanboidy, and employing 3 labourers [HO 107/2475/44].  Administration of her estate was granted to her husband, David Picton of Cilanw in the parish of Llangan, on 17 January 1873; it was valued at less than £300 pounds.

 

David Picton was living at Cilanw in the parish of Llangan, in the 1861 Census, a widower and a farmer of 70 acres, employing 1 boy and 3 servants [RG 9/4148/91].  Probate of the estate of John Bowen of Plasyparke in the parish of Trelech a’r Bettws was granted on 14 October 1870 at London to John Jones of Llwynyrhwrdd in the parish of Clydey, Gent. and to David Picton of Cilanw in the parish of Llangan, his executors.  David Picton cannot yet be traced in the 1871 Census.  David Picton was living at Cilanw, Llangan, in the 1881 Census, a widower and farmer of 95 acres, aged 71 born at Trelech [RG 11/5404/81].  In the 1891 Census he was still at Cilanw, Llangan, aged 81 a widower and farmer, born at Trelech [RG 12/4523/69].  David Picton of Mill Bank Cottage, Llanboidy, died on 10 August 1893, aged 82, and was buried at Trinity Chapel, Llanboidy, where a monumental inscription survives to him [Narberth, September 1893, 11a 635].  Probate of his estate was granted to William Picton, farmer; Thomas Philipps, Gent. and Rees Davies, surveyor at London on 25 October 1893.  The value of the esate was resworn in December 1894 as £2797:8s:3d.  David and Mary Picton do not appear to have had any children.

 

d.     JOHN PICTON, born 22 March 1812 at Glanrhyd and bapt. 12 April 1812 at Rock Chapel, Trelech.  He married Phoebe Davies [born ca 1815] on 4 April 1833 at Trelech [Witnesses: (?)].  They lived later at Pant To Farm in the parish of Llanvihangel ar Arth, and at Trechwynion in the parish of Llanarthney.  John Picton was a miller and farmer in the 1841 Census Return [HO 107/].  The Tithe Map for Llanarthney is in the TNA under reference IR 30/47/23 and the accompanying Schedule under IR 29/47/23.  He could be the John Picton who died in 1846 [Llanelly, March 1846, 26 452] or, less likely, 1847 [Bridgend, December 1847, 26 252].  The 1846 death certificate and a search of the 1841 Census should help address this identification.

 

John Picton was probably dead by 1851, as Phoebe Picton, aged 39, had remarried to William Evans, aged 25, a brewery labourer.  They were living at Upper Water Street, Llanelly, in the 1851 Census [HO 107/2468/238].  William Evans was a labourer in a tin plate works at Llanelly, aged 34, in the 1861 Census, born at Llanstephan.  Phoebe Evans was aged 40, born at Trelech, and they were living at 7 Church Street, Llanelly in the 1861 Census [RG 9/4110/103].  She had at least four further children with William Evans.  Phoebe Picton could be the person of that name who died in 1895, aged 82 [Swansea, September 1895, 11a 478].  John and Phoebe Picton were the parents of:

 

i.   HANNAH PICTON, bapt. 10 October 1833 at Trelech.  Need to check 1841 Census Return.  She was not living with her mother in the 1861 Census, and does not seem to be mentioned in the 1851 Census of Wales.

 

ii. MARY PICTON, born 1834/5, and living with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged 6 [HO 107/].  She could be the Mary Picton who was a servant at 5 Dynevor Place, Swansea, in the 1851 Census, aged 16 [HO 107/2466/273].  She was not living in Wales in the 1861 Census.

 

iii. ELEANOR PICTON, born 1835/6, and living with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged 4 [HO 107/].  Need to check later Census returns.

 

iv. DAVID PICTON, born 1839 at Llangennech [Carmarthen, June 1839, 26 574], and living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 2 [HO 107/].  He was living with his step-father and his mother in the 1851 Census at Upper Water Street, Llanelly, a scholar aged 16, born at Carmarthen [HO 107/2468/238].  He was living with his mother in the 1861 Census at Llanelly, and was described as a step-son, aged 21 and a refiner in a tin plate works [RG 9/4110/103].  David Picton married Mary ----- in 1864 [Llanelly, June 1864, 11a 867].  David Picton was living at Swansea Road, Llanelly, in the 1871 Census, aged 31, a refiner of iron, and a grocer, born at Llanvihangel [RG 10/5468/10].  He was married to Mary Picton, aged 26, born at Llanelly.  David Picton was living at Llangennech in the 1881 Census, a commercial traveller aged 39 [RG 11/5371/25].  Also living with him was his wife, Mary Picton, aged 35, born at Llanelly.  He was living at Glanyrafon Road, Llangennech, in the 1891 Census, aged 49, a commercial traveller, born at Llangennech [RG 12/4492/15].  Mary Picton was aged 46, a grocer, born at Llanelly.  David Picton of Glanyrafon Road, Llangennech, died on 7 April 1896, aged 55 [Llanelly, June 1896, 11a 511].  Administration of his estate was granted to Mary Picton, widow, on 17 June 1896; it was valued at £381:18s:9d.

 

Mary Picton was living at Glanyrafon Road, Llangennech, in the 1901 Census, a shopkeeper and grocer, aged 55, a widow, born at Llanelly [RG 13/5086/110].  David and Mary Picton were the parents of:

 

a. DAVID HUGH PICTON, born 1865 at Llanelly [Llanelly, September 1865, 11a 613].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 5 [RG 10/5468/10].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 15 [RG 11/5371/25].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, a scholar aged 25 [RG 12/4492/15].  He was not living in Wales in the 1901 Census.

 

b. GWLADYS BONNELL PICTON, born 1867 at Llanelly [Llanelly, September 1867, 11a 611].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 3 [RG 10/5468/10].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 13 [RG 11/5371/25].  Gwladys Bonnell Picton married Leonard East in 1895 [Llanelly, December 1895, 11a 1527].  Leonard and Gwladys East were living at Old Market Street, Usk, Monmouthshire, in the 1901 Census, aged 34 and 33 respectively [RG 13/4952/9].  Leonard East was a publican.  Leonard and Gwladys East were the parents of:

 

i. ALBERT SIDNEY EAST, born 1896 at Eardisley, Herefordshire [Kington, December 1896, 6a 519].  He was living with his parents in the 1901 Census, aged 4 [RG 13/4952/9].

 

ii. DORIS P. EAST, born 1898/9 at Eardisley, Herefordshire.  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 2 [RG 13/4952/9].

 

c. PHOEBE ANN PICTON, born 1869 at Felinvoel, Llanelly [Llanelly, June 1869, 11a 645].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 2 [RG 10/5468/10].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 11 [RG 11/5371/25].  She was living at Llandafen Road, Llanelly, in the 1891 Census, aged 22, a grocer at a shop [RG 12/4496/59].  Phoebe Ann Picton married Thomas Evans in 1893 [Llanelly, March 1893, 11a 1045].

 

d. JOHN SYDNEY PICTON, born 1871 at Llanelly [Llanelly, June 1871, 11a 689].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 9 [RG 11/5371/25].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, aged 19, a weigher in a foundry [RG 12/4492/15].  He was living with his mother in the 1901 Census, a clerk at a tinplate works, aged 30 [RG 13/5086/110].  John Sidney Picton married in 1907 [Narberth, September 1907, 11a 2090].

 

e. ANGELINA MARY J. PICTON, born 1873 at Llanelly [Llanelly, June 1873, 11a 734].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 7 [RG 11/5371/25].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, a grocer’s assistant, aged 17 [RG 12/4492/15].  There is no record of her marriage or burial between 1891 and 1910 at this time.

 

f. ROSETTA MAY PICTON, born 1876 at Llangennech [Llanelly, June 1876, 11a 810].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 5 [RG 11/5371/25].  She was living with her elder sister, Phoebe Picton, in the 1891 Census, aged 14 [RG 12/4496/59].  Rosetta M. Picton died in 1900, aged 24 [Llanelly, December 1900, 11a 573].

 

g. ESAU PICTON, born 1878/9 at Llangennech [.  He was not living with his parents in the 1891 Census.  He was living in the 1901 Census with his mother, a clerk in a tinplate works, aged 22 [RG 13/5086/110].  Gertrude Mary Picton, the wife of Esau Picton of the Post Office, Llangennech, died on 1 October 1909, aged 26 [Llanelly, December 1909, 11a 609].  Probate of her estate was granted to Elizabeth Melene Rees, widow, on 1 June 1916 and was valued at £71.

 

h. THOMAS OWEN B. PICTON, born 1880 at Llangennech [Llanelly, September 1880, 11a 722].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 7 months [RG 11/5371/25].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, a scholar aged 11 [RG 12/4492/15].  1901 Census.  He could be the Thomas Owen E. Picton who married in 1903 [Swansea, September 1903, 11a 1493].

 

i. ARTHUR GWILYM A. PICTON, born 1883 at Llangennech [Llanelly, June 1883, 11a 800].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, a scholar aged 9 [RG 12/4492/15].  He was living with his mother in the 1901 Census, a carpenter aged 18 [RG 13/5086/110].

 

j. EDWARD RAYMOND GORDON PICTON, born 1885 at Llangennech [Llanelly, September 1885, 11a 831].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, a scholar aged 6 [RG 12/4492/15].  He was living with his mother in the 1901 Census, a school teacher aged 16 [RG 13/5086/110].

 

k. ARCHIBALD GEORGE C. PICTON, born 1887 at Llangennech [Llanfyllin, September 1887, 11b 824].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, aged 3 [RG 12/4492/15].  He was living with his mother in the 1901 Census, aged 13 [RG 13/5086/110].

 

v. RACHEL PICTON, born 1841, and aged 2 months in the 1841 Census [Carmarthen, June 1841, 26 548].  She was living with her mother and step-father in the 1851 Census, aged 10 [HO 107/2468/238].  She cannot be found in any later Census Returns for Wales.  Rachel Picton died on 16 February 1904, aged 63.

 

e.     MARY PICTON, born 4 August 1815 at Glanrhyd, Trelech.  She married Simon Jones on 3 June 1834 at Trelech [Witnesses: (?)].  Simon Jones was living at Nantyciw, Trelech, in the 1841 Census, a farmer aged ‘20’, together with his wife, Mary Jones, aged ‘20’ [HO 107/1383/23/9].  Simon Jones was living at Garregwen, Trelech, in the 1851 Census, a farmer of 140 acres, aged 36, together with his wife, Mary Jones, aged 35, and employing 2 labourers [HO 107/2474/250].  Simon Jones was living at Carregwen, Trelech, in the 1861 Census, aged 45 [RG 9/4145/7], and in the 1871 Census, aged 55, a farmer of 120 acres employing one labourer and one boy, born at Trelech [RG 10/5503/52].  Mary Jones, his wife, was aged 55, born at Trelech.  In the 1881 Census Simon Jones was a widower and a farmer of 140 acres at Garegwen, Trelech [RG 11/5401/36].  As well as three of his children living with him, there also were William J. Davies, a grandson aged 10, and Mary Jones, a grand-daughter aged 4, both born at Trelech.  Simon Jones died in 1890, aged 74 [Carmarthen, June 1890, 11a 556].  Simon and Mary Jones were the parents of:

 

i. MORGAN JONES, born 10 April 1835 at Trelech.  He was living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 6 [HO 107/1383/23/9].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 16 [HO 107/2474/250].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 26 [RG 9/4145/7].  He could not be located in the 1871 Census.

 

ii.  STEPHEN JONES, born 1838/9 at Trelech.  He was living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 2 [HO 107/1383/23/9].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 13 [HO 107/2474/250].  Stephen Jones was living at Nantycyw in the parish of Trelech in the 1861 Census, a farmer of 90 acres, aged 22, born at Trelech [RG 9/4144/64].  Stephen Jones was living at Nantycyw, Trelech, in the 1871 Census, a farmer of 86 acres, aged 32, born at Trelech [RG 10/5503/27].  Also living with him was his wife, Anna Jones, aged 25, born at Kilrhedyn.  Stephen Jones was living at Plasyrhafod in the parish of Kilrhedyn in the 1881 Census, a farmer of 42 acres, aged 42, born at Trelech [RG 11/5431/70].  Also living with him was his wife, Anna Jones, aged 36, born at Kilrhedyn.  Stephen and Anna Jones were the parents of:

 

a. SARAH JONES, born 1866 at Kilrhedyn [Newcastle Emlyn, June 1866, 11b 17 or 11b 29].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 5 [RG 10/5503/27].  She was living at Kilrhedyn with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 15 [RG 11/5431/70].

 

b. SIMON O. JONES, born 1872/3 at Trelech.  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 8 [RG 11/5431/70].

 

c. SAMUEL PICTON JONES, born 1879 at KIlrhedyn [Newcastle Emlyn, December 1879, 11b 36].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 1 [RG 11/5431/70].

 

iii. EVAN JONES, born 1841 at Trelech.  He was living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 2 months [HO 107/1383/23/9].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 10 [HO 107/2474/250].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 20 [RG 9/4145/7].

 

iv. OWEN P. JONES, born 1843 at Trelech [Carmarthen, June 1843, 26 505].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 8 [HO 107/2474/250].  He was living with his father in the 1881 Census, aged 34 [RG 11/5401/36].  He could be the Owen P. Jones who married in 1866 to Isabel S. Gwynne [Narberth, June 1866, 11a 1023].

 

v.  ANNE JONES, born 1844/5 at Trelech.  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, aged 6 [HO 107/2474/250].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 16 [RG 9/4145/7].

 

vi. MARGARET JONES, born 1848/9 at Trelech.  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, aged 2 [HO 107/2474/250].  She was living with her brother, Stephen Jones, in the 1861 Census, a scholar aged 13 [RG 9/4144/64].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 21 [RG 10/5503/52].

 

vii. RACHEL JONES, born 1851 at Trelech [Carmarthen, March 1852, 11a 5xx].  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, aged 6 months [HO 107/2474/250].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 11 [RG 9/4145/7].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 19 [RG 10/5503/52].  She was living with her father in the 1881 Census, aged 30 [RG 11/5401/36].

 

viii. DAVID JONES, born 1853/4 at Trelech.  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 7 [RG 9/4145/7].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 17 [RG 10/5503/52].

 

ix. MARY ANN JONES, born 1855/6 at Trelech.  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 5 [RG 9/4145/7].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 15 [RG 10/5503/52].  She was living with her father in the 1881 Census, aged 25 [RG 11/5401/36].

 

f.     STEPHEN PICTON, born 17 April 1818 at Glanrhyd and bapt. 7 May 1818 at Trelech.  He went to live at Cynwil Elfed.  He died on 18 March 1839, aged 21 [Carmarthen, March 1839, 26 414].  His obituary notice in The Welshman describes him as a draper of Cynwil (Elfed).

 

g.     MARGARET PICTON, born 12 August 1820 at Glanrhyd, Trelech.  She was living with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged ‘15’ [HO 107/1383/23/18].  Margaret Picton married John Owen, a farmer at Cilhirwydd, Llanboidy, son of Thomas Owen, a farmer, on 17 October 1848 at Llanboidy church, by licence [Carmarthen, December 1848, 26 979; Witnesses: David Picton and John Richard].  John Owen was a farmer of 27 acres, living at Drefach in the parish of Llanboidy in the 1851 Census, aged 29, born at Llanboidy [HO 107/2475/45].  Margaret Owen was aged 30, born at Trelech.  John Owen was living at Cytherwidd in the parish of Llanboidy in the 1861 Census, a farmer aged 39 [RG 9/4146/3].  Also living with him was his wife, Margaret Owen, aged 40, born at Trelech.  John Owen was living at Kilhirwith in the parish of Llanboidy in the 1871 Census, a farmer of 50 acres, born at Llanboidy [RG 10/5505/6].  Also living with him was his wife, Margaret Owen, aged 50, born at Trelech.  John and Margaret Owen were the parents of:

 

i.   OWEN OWEN, born 1848 at Llanboidy [Newcastle Emlyn, March 1848, 26 660].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 2 [HO 107/2475/45].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, a scholar aged 11 [RG 9/4146/3].

 

ii.  THOMAS OWEN, born 1850 at Llanboidy [Carmarthen, June 1850, 26 623].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 1 [HO 107/2475/45].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, a scholar aged 10 [RG 9/4146/3].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 20 [RG 10/5505/6].

 

iii. MARY ANN OWEN, born 1853/4 at Llanboidy.  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 7 [RG 9/4146/3].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 17 [RG 10/5505/6].

 

iv. ELINOR OWEN, born 1856 at Llanboidy [Narberth, June 1856, 11a 647].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 4 [RG 9/4146/3].

 

v.  PHOEBE PICTON OWEN, born 1857/8 at Llanboidy.  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 3 [RG 9/4146/3].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 13 [RG 10/5505/6].

 

vi. DAVID PICTON OWEN, born 1861 at Llanboidy [Narberth, June 1861, 11a 689].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 1 month [RG 9/4246/3].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 10 [RG 10/5505/6].  David Picton Owen married at London in 1886 to either Adeine Josephine Ingram or Edith Mary Turner [Strand, December 1886, 1b 926].

 

vii.   MARGARET PICTON OWEN, born 1865 at Llanboidy [Narberth, December 1865, 11a 668].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census,aged 5 [RG 10/5505/6].

 

h.     ANNE PICTON, born 25 January 1824 at Glanrhyd, Trelech.  She was living with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged ‘15’ [HO 107/1383/23/18], and at Glanrhyd farm, Trelech, unmarried, in the 1851 Census, aged 27 [HO 107/2474/].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 38 [RG 9/4144/68].  She could be the Anne Picton who was married in 1875 to either John James or Thomas Thomas [Cardigan, December 1875, 11b 18].

 

i.     GEORGE PICTON, born May 1825 at Glanrhyd.  He was living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged ‘15’ [HO 107/1383/23/18].  He is probably the George Picton, who died in 1844 [Carmarthen, September 1844, 26 333].

 

j.    WILLIAM PICTON, born 20 April 1828 and bapt. at Rock Chapel, Trelech.  He was living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 12 [HO 107/1383/23/18].  He was living with his parents at Glanrhyd, Trelech, in the 1851 Census, aged 21 [HO 107/2474/].  William Picton married Anna Bowen on 25 March 1856 at Trelech [Witnesses: (?); Carmarthen, March 1856, 11a 743].  She is probably the Anna Picton, aged 25, living with her father, John Bowen and his wife, Anne Bowen, a farmer of 150 acres at Plasparke farm, Trelech, in the 1861 Census, employing 4 men [RG 9/4144/70].  William Picton was not living with her family but with his own father, Owen Picton, at Glanrhyd farm in the 1861 Census [RG 9/4144/68].

 

William Picton was aged 44, a farmer of 140 acres, employing 3 labourers, at Glanrhyd Farm, Trelech, in the 1871 Census [RG 10/5503/37].  Also living with him was his wife, Anna Picton, aged 31, born at Trelech.  Anna Picton was dead by 1881, and is probably the Anna Picton who died in 1875, aged 38 [Carmarthen, March 1875, 11a 661].  William Picton was living at Glanrhyd, Trelech, in the 1881 Census, a widower and a farmer of 130 acres, aged 52 [RG 11/5401/25].  He seems to have moved from Glanrhyd farm to Plasparke Uchaf farm in the parish of Trelech between 1881 and 1888, as he was living there when he was one of the executors of the will of his nephew, Philip Picton, in 1888.  Perhaps this was to do with the fact that he was a tenant farmer at Glanrhyd, but would have been owner of the farm at Plasparke.  William Picton was living at Plaspark Ucha[f], Trelech, in the 1891 Census, a widower and farmer, aged 62 [RG 12/4520/43].  He was an executor of the estate of his brother, David Picton of Llanboidy, in 1893.  William Picton was living in the 1901 Census at Plasparke, Trelech a’r Bettws, a widower and a farmer aged 72, born at Trelech [RG 13/5116/36].  William Picton of Plasparke Uchaf, Trelech a’r Bettws, a retired farmer, died on 31 March 1916, aged 88.  Probate of his estate was granted on 16 August 1916 to Owen Picton, a licensed victualler and farmer, and George Picton, a farmer, his sons.  The estate was valued at £2309:13s:9d.  William and Anna Picton were the parents of:

 

i.   JOHN BOWEN PICTON, born 1856 at Trelech [Carmarthen, June 1856, 11a 693].  He was living with his mother at Plasparke farm, Trelech, in the 1861 Census, aged 5 [RG 9/4144/70].  He was a farmer’s son, living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 15 [RG 10/5503/37].  John Bowen Picton died in 1877, aged 21 [Carmarthen, December 1877, 11a 472].

 

ii.  ANN(E) PICTON, born 1858 at Trelech [Carmarthen, March 1858, 11a 623].  She was not living with her mother in the 1861 Census, but with her father at Glanrhyd farm [RG 9/4144/68].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 14 [RG 10/5503/37].  She was living at home with her father in the 1881 Census, aged 23 [RG 11/5401/25].

 

iii. OWEN PICTON, born 1859 at Trelech [Carmarthen, December 1859, 11a 639].  He was living with his mother at Plasparke farm, Trelech, in the 1861 Census, aged 2 [RG 9/4144/70].  He was a scholar, living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 12 [RG 10/5503/37].  He was living with his father in the 1881 Census, aged 21 [RG 11/5401/25].  He is probably the Owen Picton, who married Anna Evans in 1881 [Carmarthen, June 1881, 11a 1077].  Anna Picton died in 1884, aged 27 [Carmarthen, December 1884, 11a 548].

 

Owen Picton remarried to Anna Jones in 1889 [Carmarthen, September 1889, 11a 1349].  Owen Picton was living at the New Inn, Trelech, in the 1891 Census, a publican aged 31, together with his wife, Anna Picton, aged 36, born at Trelech [RG 12/4520/42].  The New Inn was located just across the square from Capel y Graig, Trelech.  They also had a step-son, Johnny E. Jones living with them, aged 10, born at Trelech.  Owen Picton was living at Trelech a’r Bettws in the 1901 Census, aged 41, an innkeeper at the Old Inn, and assistant overseer [RG 13/5116/36].  Also living with him was his wife, Anna Picton, aged 46, born at Trelech.  He was an executor of his father’s estate in 1916.  Owen Picton of the Old Inn, Trelech a’r Bettws, died in 1918 [Pembrokeshire RO, D/WR/555]. 

 

iv. MARY PICTON, born 1862 at Trelech [Carmarthen, December 1862, 11a 596].  She was a scholar, living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 9 [RG 10/5503/37].  She was living with her father in the 1881 Census, aged 19 [RG 11/5401/25].  She was living with her father in the 1891 Census, aged 29 [RG 12/4520/43].

 

v.  MORGAN JONES PICTON, born 1864 at Trelech [Carmarthen, September 1864, 11a 669].  He was a scholar, living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 7 [RG 10/5503/37].  Morgan Picton was living with his father in the 1881 Census, aged 16 [RG 11/5401/25].  He was living with his father in the 1891 Census, aged 26 [RG 12/4520/43].  He was living at Trelech a’r Bettws in the 1901 Census, aged 36, a farmer’s son [RG 13/5116/36].  Morgan Jones Picton died in 1909, aged 45 [Carmarthen, December 1909, 11a 691].

 

vi. SARAH PICTON, born 1868 at Trelech [Carmarthen, June 1868, 11a 781].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 3 [RG 10/5503/37].  She was living with her father in the 1881 Census, aged 12 [RG 11/5401/25].  She was living with her father in the 1891 Census, aged 22 [RG 12/4520/43].  She is probably the Sarah Picton who married David Thomas in 1895 [Carmarthen, September 1895, 11a 1526].  David and Sarah Thomas were living at Ffynonwen fawr in Trelech a’r Bettws in the 1901 Census [RG 13/5116/24].  David Thomas was a farmer, aged 27, born at Trelech and Sarah Thomas was aged 31, born at Trelech.  David and Sarah Thomas were the parents of:

 

a. ANNA THOMAS, born 1896 at Trelech [Carmarthen, September 1896, 11a 1157].  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 4 [RG 13/5116/24].

 

vii. GEORGE PICTON, born 1870 at Trelech [Carmarthen, September 1870, 11a 705].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 1 [RG 10/5503/37].  He was living with his father in the 1881 Census, aged 10 [RG 11/5401/25].  George Picton was living at Plaspark Ucha, Trelech, in the 1891 Census, aged 20 [RG 12/4520/43].  He is probably the George Picton married in 1894 to Phoebe Jane Thomas [Carmarthen, June 1894, 11a 1425].  George Picton was a farmer at Bailey Mawr, Llangan East, in the 1901 Census, aged 30 [RG 13/5118/160].  Also living with him was his wife, Phoebe Jane Picton, aged 27, born at Trelech.  He was an executor of his father’s estate in 1916.  He may have taken over the Old Inn at Trelech from his elder brother, Owen Picton, in 1918.  George and Phoebe Picton were the parents of:

 

a. ANNIE LOUISA PICTON, born 1896 at Abernant [Carmarthen, March 1896, 11a 1126].  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 5 [RG 13/5118/160].

 

b. WILLIAM OWEN PICTON, born 1899 at Abernant [Carmarthen, September 1899, 11a 1111].  He was living with his parents in the 1901 Census, aged 1 [RG 13/5118/130].

 

ii         STEPHEN PICTON, draper of Bath and London, probably born ca 1781/2.  Letters from him survive in the Carmarthen Record Office and include one written from Myles Road, Market Place, Bath, to his parents, dated 22 November 1813.  He was working in a shop as an assistant with ten other young men.  He had been working for a Mr. Price, but had left his employment there more than a fortnight before.  He asked for his brother, Jacob Picton, to “write the next letter with all the news he has”.  There is another letter from Bath to his parents, dated 24 February 1814, in which he mentions a letter he has received from his cousin in America [Thomas Picton] on 15 February 1814.

 

Another letter from Stephen Picton is from 53 Wigmore Street and Cavendish Street, London, dated 23 April 1822.  This makes clear that he had just opened a shop in London on 8 April 1822.  It was staffed by four young men, a porter, Mr. Woods and himself.  He had laid in a very heavy stock of goods - worth about £4,000.  It might be possible to trace him in contemporary London Trade Directories or Voting Lists, and it would be worth-while checking out what were the local London churches and Welsh Chapels close to Wigmore and Cavendish Street at this time.  There are no relevant deaths of a Stephen Picton between the September Quarter of 1837 and the December Quarter of 1851, so he was presumably dead by 1837 and therefore died in London between 1822 and 1837, predating the start of civil registration.  He died in London, aged about 50 [Glyn Picton MSS, NLW].

 

iii. MARY PICTON, born 1782/3 at Whitechurch.  She married John Davies of Penalltydre, St. Dogmells, on 25 June 1808 at Whitechurch [Witnesses: (?)].  She is probably the Mary Davies, widow, a farmer of 64 acres, living at St. Dogmells in the 1851 Census, aged 68, born at Whitechurch [HO 107/2481/396].  She was living in 1853.  All her descendants are dead [Glyn Picton MSS, NLW].  John Davies must have died before this date.  John and Mary Davies were the parents of:

 

a.     MARY DAVIES, born ca 1808/9 at Whitechurch.  She was living with her mother at St. Dogmells in the 1851 Census, aged 42 [HO 107/2481/396].

 

b.     DAVID DAVIES, born ca 1812/3 at St. Dogmells.  He was living with his mother in the 1851 Census, aged 38 [HO 107/2481/396].

 

c.     JOHN DAVIES, born 1822/3 at St. Dogmells.  He was living with his mother in the 1851 Census, aged 28 [HO 107/2481/396].

 

d.     LEWIS DAVIES, born at St. Dogmells.  He was living with his mother in the 1851 Census, when his age was given as 8 – but this looks very suspicious [HO 107/2481/396].

 

iv.          THOMAS PICTON, bapt. 5 September 1785 of Llanvair (Nantgwyn) [in the register for Penygroes Chapel, RG 4/3915, as ‘Llanvair 7ber 5th, Thomas, son of Thomas Picton, baptised'].  He presumably died young.

 

v.          THOMAS PICTON, bapt. 3 March 1787 as Thomas, son of Thomas Picton of Tir Bwll [= Ty’r bwlch], Whitechurch [RG 4/3915].  Thomas Picton married Mary Evans on 7 May 1811 at Eglwyswrw church [Witnesses: John Rees and Jacob Picton].  He was living at Tycanol, Whitechurch, from 1818-1825.  Mary Picton of Tycanol was a member of Penygroes Chapel in September 1818 [RG 4/3773].

 

Thomas Picton later was living at Gwndwn Farm in the parish of Bridell, Pembrokeshire, from 1829, and this can be checked out and confirmed in the Land Tax Returns for that parish, 1786-1831, from which the year of his arrival in the parish can be found.  The Tithe Map for Bridell is in the TNA under reference IR 30/54/9 and the accompanying Schedule under IR 29/54/9.  In the 1841 Census Thomas Picton was a farmer at Bridell, aged 51, along with his wife, Mary Picton, aged 50 [HO 107/1447/1/7].  In the 1851 Census Thomas and Mary Picton were living at Gwndun, Bridell, aged 63 and 49 respectively [HO 107/2481/252].  Thomas Picton was a farmer of 30 acres and was born at Eglwyswrw, as was also his wife.  Only their son, Evan Picton, then remained with them at the farm.  Thomas Picton was living at Gwndwn, Bridell, in the 1861 Census, a farmer aged 73, born at Whitechurch [RG 9/4177/38].  Also living with him was his wife, Mary Picton, aged 66, born at Eglwyswrw.  Thomas Picton of Gwndwn, Bridell, died on 28 June 1864, aged 78, and was buried at Penygroes Chapel, Whitechurch [Cardigan, June 1864, 11b 8].  His wife could be the Mary Picton who died in 1870, aged 78 [Cardigan, March 1870, 11a 1].

 

The occupier of Tycanol at the time of the 1839 Tithe Map of Whitechurch was Stephen Morris, and the farm and land was owned by John Morris, who owned and lived at Treowen, the adjoining farm to Tycanol.  The 1831 Land Tax Return shows Stephen Morris living at Coedcenlas Isaf, owned by Mrs Colby, and John Morris was living at Tycanol, which he also owned.[18]  Stephen Morris married on 3 December 1835 at Meline.  Stephen Morris was living at Tycanol in the 1861 Census, a farmer of 38 acres, aged 49, born at Whitechurch, together with his wife, Rachel Morris, aged 48, and their son, David Morris, aged 19 [RG 9/4174/49], and in the 1871 Census, aged 60, a farmer of 40 acres, born at Whitechurch.  This is similar to the size of the farm on the 1839 Tithe Map, where its size [Schedule numbers 128 to 143 on the Map] was given as 37 acres 0 roods and 4 perches.  Also living with Stephen Morris in the 1871 Census were his wife, Rachel Morris, aged 58 [born Mynachlogddu], and their son David Morris, aged 30, born at Whitechurch [RG 10/5539/74].  The Morris family of Whitechurch deserve further investigation as there are various Picton/Morris connections in Whitechurch, beginning with the marriage of Rachel Picton to a Morris, probably around 1770.  Caleb Morris, a retired Independent Minister, was living at Coedcenlas Isaf in the 1861 Census of Whitechurch, unmarried, aged 59, born at Whitechurch [RG 9/4174/51].  It could be interesting to obtain a copy of his will.

 

Unfortunately there is a major gap in the marriage register entries for the parish of Whitechurch.  No entries survive from 1759 to 1799 [and this includes a banns register for Whitechurch, 1755-1759, misplaced in the parish records for Bridell, and the Bishops Transcripts, which commence in 1799.  The complete marriage register is missing from 1755 to 1813, so a search of the index of St. Davids Archdeaconary wills and administrations for Morris and Marsden entries may prove more promising.

 

Thomas and Mary Picton were the parents of:

 

a.    WILLIAM PICTON, bapt. .  Was he the William Picton who died in 1848 [Cardigan, June 1848, 27 36]?

 

b.    DAVID PICTON, bapt. ?

 

c.     STEPHEN PICTON, bapt. 10 February 1819 at Penygroes Chapel, Whitechurch, aged 4 weeks.[19]  He was not living in Pembrokeshire at the time of the 1841 Census.  Stephen Picton was one of the 1841 Census enumerators for Cynwil Elfed [11 June 1841] and was a draper living in Conwil village, aged ‘20’, together with his younger sister, Martha Picton, aged 15 [HO 107/1383/7/57].  Also living at the same address were David Davies, Ind(ependent), aged ‘60’ and Mary Thomas, aged ‘20’.  Stephen Picton, a shopkeeper of Cynwil Elfed, married Mary Marsden, daughter of Thomas Marsden, farmer, and his wife Phoebe, the daughter of Edward James of Aberelwyn, Pembrokeshire, on 11 June 1844 at Penygroes Chapel [Witnesses: Thomas Marsden, Pontfaen, and Thomas Picton, Gwndwn].  Mary Marsden was distintly related to Stephen Picton, via the marriage of Margaret Picton to Godfrey Marsden at Whitechurch in 1805.

 

Stephen Picton was a shopkeeper living at Cynwil Elfed in the 1851 Census, together with his wife, Mary Picton (born 1818/9), both aged 32, both born at Whitechurch, and one servant [HO 107/2474/219], and in the 1861 Census, both aged 40 [RG 9/4144/23].  In the 1871 Census he was living at Cynwil Elfed, aged 50 [RG 10/5502/56] and described as a draper and post master, as also in the 1881 Census, aged 62 [RG 11/5400/118].  His wife, Mary Picton, was aged 38 in the 1861 Census, aged 47 in the 1871 Census, and aged 60 in the 1881 Census, also born at Whitechurch [ca 1823/4].  A grand-daughter, Margaret J. Miles, aged 5, was living with them in the 1881 Census.

 

By the 1891 Census Stephen Picton had reverted to a grocer again and was living at the Post Office in Cynwil Elfed, aged 72, together with his wife, Mary Picton, aged 68 [RG 12/4520/7].  Stephen and Mary Picton also had two grandchildren living with them in the 1891 Census return; Eleanor B. Mills, aged 4 and Margaretta J. Mills, aged 15.  Stephen Picton, a grocer and draper, died on 26 November 1892 at Cynwil Elfed, aged 73 [Carmarthen, December 1892, 11a 590].  Probate of his estate was granted to at London on 12 January 1893 to William Picton, schoolmaster.  His estate was valued at £380:8s:9d.  Mary Picton, his widow, was living at the Post Office, Cynwil Elfed, in the 1901 Census, a widow aged 79 and also a draper and grocer, born at Whitechurch [RG 13/5115/107].  His widow, Mary Picton, of the Post Office, Cynwil Elfed, died on 24 August 1906 [Carmarthen ].  Probate of her estate was granted to her son, William Picton, schoolmaster, on 2 January 1907 and was valued at £295:7s:6d.  Stephen and Mary Picton were the parents of:

 

i. PHOEBE PICTON, born 1845 at Cynwil Elfed [Carmarthen, March 1845, 26 43].  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, aged 6 [HO 107/2474/].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 16 [RG 9/4144/25].  Phoebe Picton married Griffith Thomas Miles in 1867 [Carmarthen, June 1867, 11a 966].  Griffith Miles was living at Cynwil Elfed in the 1871 Census, a schoolmaster aged 26, born at Cilrhedyn [RG 10/5503/10].  Also living with him was his wife, Phoebe Miles, aged 25, born at Cynwil Elfed.  Griffith and Phoebe Miles were living at Cross Roads, Nevern, Pembrokeshire, in the 1881 Census, both aged 36 [RG 11/5426/18] and at the same address in the 1891 Census [RG 12/4542/96].  He was still an elementary schoolmaster.

 

Phoebe Miles died in 1899, aged 54, probably at Nevern [Cardigan, December 1899, 11b 1].  Griffith Thomas Miles, a widower aged 56, an elementary school teacher, was living at Cross Roads, Nevern, in the 1901 Census [RG 13/5134/94].  Griffith and Phoebe Picton were the parents of:

 

a. MARY ANNE MILES, born 1868 at Cynwil Elfed [Carmarthen, March 1868, 11a 718].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 3 [RG 10/5503/10].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 13 [RG 11/5426/18].  She was not living with her parents in the 1891 Census.  She was living with her brother, Egbert N. Miles, at 5 Cannon Street, Bristol, in the 1901 Census, a draper’s assistant, aged 32, born at Conwil [RG 13/2362/5].

 

b. EDWARD P. MILES, born 1868/9 at Cynwil Elfed [Most of 1868 and 1869 unindexed in October 2005].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 2 [RG 10/5503/10].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 11 [RG 11/5426/18].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, a sailor aged 21 [RG 12/4542/96].

 

c. EGBERT NATHANIEL MILES, born 1871 at Cynwil Elfed [Carmarthen, September 1871, 11a 738].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 9 [RG 11/5426/18].  He was living at 17 Redcliff Hill, St. Mary Redcliff, Bristol, in the 1891 Census, a draper’s assistant, aged 19, born at Conwil [RG 12/1957/92].  He was living at 5 Cannon Street, Bristol, in the 1901 Census, a draper aged 29, born at Conwil [RG 13/2362/5].

 

d. GRIFFITH JOHN MILES, born 1873 at Nevern [Cardigan, December 1873, 11b 1].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, a scholar aged 7 [RG 11/5426/18].  He was living at 57 Picton Street, Merthyr Tydfil, in the 1891 Census, a grocer’s apprentice, aged 17, born at Nevern [RG 12/4437/29].  He was living at 3 Vale Grove, East Acton, London, in the 1901 Census, a grocer’s assistant, aged 27, born at Velindre, Pembrokeshire [RG 13/1201/54].

 

e. MARGARETTA JANE MILES, born 1875 at Nevern [Cardigan, December 1875, 11b 1].  She was living with her grandparents, Stephen and Eliza Picton, in the 1881 Census, aged 5 [RG 11/5400/118].  She was living with her grandparents, Stephen and Eliza Picton, in the 1891 Census, aged 15 [RG 12/4520/7].  Margaretta Miles married in 1898 to William Pugh Williams [Carmarthen, March 1898, 11a 1265].

 

f. ELIZABETH MARIA MILES, born 1877 at Nevern [Cardigan, December 1877, 11b 1].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 3 [RG 11/5426/18].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, aged 13 [RG 12/4542/96].  She was living with her father in the 1901 Census, aged 23 [RG 13/5134/94].

 

g. CATHERINE JUSTINA MILES, born 1880 at Nevern [Cardigan, March 1880, 11b 3].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 1 [RG 11/5426/18].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, aged 11 [RG 12/4542/96].  She was living with her brother, Egbert N. Miles, at 5 Cannon Street, Bristol, in the 1901 Census, a draper’s assistant, aged 21, born at Nevern [RG 13/2362/5].

 

h. SARAH JULIA MILES, born 1884 at Nevern [Cardigan, June 1884, 11b 1].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, aged 7 [RG 12/4542/96].  Sarah Julia Miles died in 1896, aged 12 [Cardigan, September 1896, 11b 2].

 

i. ELEANOR B. MILES, born 1886/7.  She was living with her grandparents, Stephen and Eliza Picton, in the 1891 Census, aged 4 [RG 12/4520/7].

 

j. THOMAS MARSDEN MILES, born 1888 at Nevern [Cardigan, March 1888, 11b 2].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, aged 3 [RG 12/4542/96].  He was living with his father in the 1901 Census, aged 13 [RG 13/5134/94].

 

ii. THOMAS MARSDEN PICTON, born 1846 at Cynwil Elfed [Carmarthen, September 1846, 11a 578].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 4 [HO 107/2474/219].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 14 [RG 9/4144/25].  He was not living with his parents and could not be located in the 1871 Census.  He married Catherine Morgan, daughter of William Morgan of Narberth, on 11 June 1878 at the Tabernacle Chapel, Narberth [Narberth, June 1878, 11a 944].  She is probably the Catherine Picton, who died in 1879, aged 22 [Bristol, September 1879, 6a 3].  Thomas Marsden Picton was living at 144 Redcliffe Street, Bristol, in the 1881 Census, a linen draper employing 4 assistants, a widower aged 34, born at Conwil [RG 11/2465/22].  John Daniel, a relative aged 43, born at Nevern in Pembrokeshire, was also living with him in the 1881 Census.

 

Thomas Marsden Picton remarried in 1882 to Elizabeth Powell [Upton-on-Severn, Worcestershire, September 1882, 6c 463].  He was living later at Bristol, as his second wife, Elizabeth Picton, of Waterloo Villa, Woodfield Road, Clifton, in the city of Bristol, died on 26 May 1890 [Barton R., June 1890, 6a 94].  Elizabeth Picton left a will, which was proved on 2 August 1890 by her husband and Charles Butcher of Maeshendre Villa, Glasbury, Breconshire, an estate agent.  The value of her estate was £2883:3s:8d.  He was living at 8 Woodfield Road, Westbury on Trym, Somerset, in the 1891 Census, a widower aged 44 [RG 12/1988/35].  He was a Commission Agent.  Thomas Marsden Picton remarried again in Anglesey in 1891 to Sarah Anne Rowlands [Bangor, December 1891, Volume 11b 821].  It could be worth obtaining this marriage certificate to find out where he was living.  He should be in the 1901 Census, but it has not yet proved possible to trace him.

 

Thomas Marsden Picton of 30 Downleaze, Stoke Bishop, Bristol, died on 31 January 1930, aged 83.  Probate of his estate was granted on 17 April 1930 to Frank Hart Doyle, managing clerk, John Picton, gent., and Sarah Anne Picton, his widow.  The John Picton, Gent., is presumably his younger brother.  The value of his estate was £14,839:4s:1d.  The date of death of his widow, Sarah Anne Picton, is not known at this time.

 

iii. EDWARD PICTON, born 1848 at Conwil [Carmarthen, September 1848, 26 588].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 2 [HO 107/2474/219].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 12 [RG 9/4144/25].  He was not living with his parents in the 1871 Census.  He became a draper’s assistant at Carmarthen and died, unmarried, on 9 October 1873 [Carmarthen, December 1873, 11a 524].  Administration of his estate was granted to his father, Stephen Picton, on 20 February 1874; it was valued at less than £300 pounds.

 

iv. WILLIAM PICTON, born 1850 at Conwil [Carmarthen, June 1850, 26 629].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 1 [HO 107/2474/219].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 10 [RG 9/4144/25].  He was living at college at Bangor, training to be a teacher in the 1871 Census, aged 21 [RG 10/5727/68].  He could be the William Picton married in 1872 [Carmarthen, March 1872, 11a 901].  William Picton was living at 22 William Street, Cardigan, in the 1881 Census, a school master aged 31, born at Conwil [RG 11/5427/120].  He was granted probate of his father’s estate in 1893.  He became a schoolmaster and was a certified teacher, living at 8 Curnen Terrace, Margam, Glamorganshire, in the 1901 Census, aged 51, unmarried, born at Conwil Elfed [RG 13/5052/7].  He was the executor of his mother’s estate in 1907.  William Picton of Green Park, Cynwil Elfed, died on 16 April 1924, aged about 74.  Probate of his estate was granted on 18 September 1924 to John Picton, J.P., his brother, and John Jenkins, a retired teacher, his brother-in-law; his estate was valued at £2400:2s:4d.

 

v.  MARY ANN(E) PICTON, born 1852 at Conwil [Carmarthen, June 1852, 11a 539].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 9 [RG 9/4144/25].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 19 [RG 10/5502/56].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 27 [RG 11/5400/113].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, unmarried, aged 37 [RG 12/4520/7].  She was living with her mother in the 1901 Census, unmarried, aged 47 [RG 13/5115/107].

 

vi. MARGARET PICTON, born 1854 at Conwil [Carmarthen, March 1854, 11a 549].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 7 [RG 9/4144/25].  She was not living with her parents in the 1871 Census.  She is probably the Margaret Picton, married in 1880 to John Jenkins [Carmarthen, December 1880, 11a 1207].

 

vii OWEN PICTON, born 1855 at Conwil [Carmarthen, December 1855, 11a 513].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 5 [RG 9/4144/25].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 15 [RG 10/5502/56].  Owen Picton married Mary Jones in 1890 [Carmarthen, June 1890, Vol. 11a 1463].

 

Owen Picton was a farmer living at Blaenhafan, Abernant, in the 1891 Census, aged 35, born at Conwil, together with his wife, Mary Picton, aged 44, born at Abernant [RG 12/4519/86].  They had no children living with them in this Census Return.  Owen Picton was living at Blaenhafan, Abernant, in the 1901 Census, a farmer aged 44, born at Conwil [RG 13/5115/86].  Also living with him was his wife, Mary Picton, aged 53, born at Abernant, a farm servant, Mary Edwards, aged 28, and a niece, Rachel Jones, aged 8, born at Newchurch.  His wife, Mary Picton, may have died in 1903, aged 56 [Carmarthen, March 1903, 11a 675].

 

viii.  ELIZABETH PICTON, born 1858 at Conwil [Carmarthen, March 1858, 11a 625].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 3 [RG 9/4144/25].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 13 [RG 10/5502/56].  She was living with her brother, Thomas Marsden Picton, at Bristol in the 1881 Census, aged 22, born at Conwil, a draper’s assistant [RG 11/2465/22].  Elizabeth Picton married in 1885 to David Mansel Job [Carmarthen, September 1885, 11a 1129].  David and Elizabeth Job were living at Tymawr in the parish of Conwil in the 1891 Census [RG 12/4520/12].  David M. Job was aged 34, an elementary school teacher, born at Llanarthney and Elizabeth Job was aged 32, born at Conwil.  David and Elizabeth Job were living at Tymawr, Cynwil Elfed, in the 1901 Census [RG 13/5116/10].  He was an elementary school teacher, aged 44, born at Llanarthney.  David and Elizabeth Job were the parents of:

 

a. ELEANOR MARY JOB, born 1886 [Carmarthen, September 1886, 11a 923].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, aged 4 [RG 12/4520/12].  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 14 [RG 13/5116/10].

 

ix. JOHN PICTON, born 24 December 1859 at Cynwil Elfed [Carmarthen, March 1860, 11a 673].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 1 [RG 9/4144/25].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 12 [RG 10/5502/56].  He was living with his brother, Thomas Marsden Picton, at Bristol in the 1881 Census, aged 20, a draper’s assistant, born at Conwil [RG 11/2465/22].

 

John Picton married Martha Lewis Martell of Sketty, Swansea, on 17 August 1877 [Carmarthen, September 1877, 11a 943].  John Picton was living at Bedminster, Bristol, in the 1891 Census, a draper aged 31, born at Conwil [RG 12/1946/105].  Also living with him was his wife, Martha Picton, aged 31, born at Aberdare.  John Picton was living at Truscoed House, in the parish of Llandeilofawr, East Carmarthenshire, in the 1901 Census, a retired draper, aged 41, born at Cynwil Elfed, and his wife, Martha Picton, aged 41, was born at Aberdare [RG 13/5105/26].  He became a Justice of the Peace [J.P.] at Llandeilo.  John Picton was granted probate of the estate of his brother, William Picton, in 1924 and joint probate of the estate of his brother, Thomas Marsden Picton, in 1930.  John and Martha Picton were the parents of:

 

a. ELSIE MARY PICTON, born 1891 at Bristol [Bedminster, March 1891, 5c 673].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, aged 10 weeks [RG 12/1946/105].  She was living at Vrondeg, Cockett, Glamorganshire, in the 1901 Census, with Philip L. Martell, a solicitor, her uncle; she was aged 10, born at Bristol [RG 13/5081/5].

 

b. GWYNETH IDA PICTON, born 1892 at Bristol [Bedminster, March 1892, 5c 659].  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 9 [RG 13/5105/26].  Gwyneth Ida Picton of Truscod in the parish of Llandeilo died on 11 May 1916.  Administration of her estate was granted to her father, John Picton, a retired draper, on 10 July 1916 and was valued at £775:11s:9d.

 

c. DORIS MARTHA PICTON, born 1896 at Bristol [Barton Regis, September 1896, 6a 55].  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 4 [RG 13/5105/26].

 

x.  DAVID MARSDEN PICTON, born 1861 at Conwil [Carmarthen, September 1861, 11a 617].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 10 [RG 10/5502/56].  He was living with his brother, Thomas Marsden Picton, at Bristol in the 1881 Census, aged 18, a pupil teacher [RG 11/2465/22].  David Marsden Picton was living at Narberth South in the 1891 Census, a boarder and Congregational Minister, aged 29 [RG 12/4525/12].  David Marsden Picton married Elizabeth Mary Hadingham in 1894 [Blything, December 1894, 4a 1855].  David Marsden Picton was living at 31 London Road, Halesworth, Suffolk, in the 1901 Census, a Congregational Minister aged 39, born at Conwil, Carmarthenshire [RG 13/1795/11].  Also living with him was his wife, Elizabeth Mary Picton, aged 37, born at Halesworth Suffolk.  David Marsden Picton of Witham, Essex, died on 8 June 1916, aged 54.  Probate of his estate was granted to his widow, Elizabeth Mary Picton, on 10 August 1916 and was valued at £282:15s:2d.  David and Elizabeth Picton were the parents of:

 

a. GWYNETH ELIZABETH MARY PICTON, born 1896 at Halesworth [Blything, December 1896, 4a 986].  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 4 [RG 13/1795/11].

 

xi. STEPHEN PICTON, born 1864 at Conwil [Carmarthen, December 1864, 11a 707].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 6 [RG 10/5502/56].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 16 [RG 11/5400/113].  Stephen Picton was not recorded in the 1891 Census for Wales.

 

xii.  JACOB PICTON, born 1867 at Conwil [Carmarthen, March 1867, 11a 699].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 4 [RG 10/5502/56].  A Jacob Picton, aged 22, an engineer, born at Llanfyrnach, was a boarder at 3 Prospect Place, Aberdare, in the 1891 Census with Mary Evans, a widow, and her family [RG 12/4443/38].  Mary Evans was aged 67, born at Llanboidy.  Jacob Picton was living at 26 Cemetery Road, Aberdare, in the 1901 Census, a collier aged 32, born at Llanfyrnach [RG 13/5034/50].  Also living with him was his wife, Margaret Ann Picton, aged 26, born at Llandissilio, Pembrokeshire.  He is probably the Jacob Picton who married Margaret Ann Richards in 1899 [Narberth, March 1899, 11a 1315].  In the 1901 Census Jacob and Margaret Ann Picton had two boarders living with them, but no children.

 

A Jacob Picton was living at Kensington, London, in the 1901 Census, a boarder, unmarried, a draper’s buyer aged 32, born in Wales [RG 13/21/116].

 

d.     EVAN PICTON, born at Bridell and bapt. 17 October 1821 at Penygroes, Whitechurch, aged 5 weeks.  He was living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 18 [HO 107/1447/1/7].  Evan Picton was living at Gwndun in the parish of Bridell in the 1851 Census with his parents, aged 28 [HO 107/2481/252].  Evan Picton was married in 1857 [Cardigan, December 1857, 11b 32].  He was living at Ddolaley, Penrith, in the 1861 Census, aged 35, a farmer of 62 acres, born at Whitechurch [RG 9/4181/59].  Also living with him was his wife, Margaret Picton, aged 30, born at Manordeifi.  Evan Picton was living at Penrith [Penreith] in the 1871 Census, a farmer of 50 acres, aged 49, born at Bridell, together with his wife, Margaret Picton, aged 44, born at Manordeifi [RG 10/5544/119].  The Tithe Map for Penrith is in the TNA under reference IR 29/54/106 and the accompanying schedule under IR 30/54/106.  Margaret Picton died in 1879, aged 52 [Newcastle Emlyn, June 1879, 11b 15].

 

Evan Picton was living at Dolale in Penrith in the 1881 Census, a widower and a farmer of 70 acres, aged 60 [RG 11/5432/62].  Evan Picton was living at Capel Colman in the 1891 Census, a widower and general labourer, aged 69, born at Bridell [RG 12/4547/116].  Evan Picton died in 1897, aged 65 (actually aged 75) [Newcastle Emlyn, September 1897, 11b 13].  Evan and Margaret Picton were the parents of:

 

i. MARY PICTON, born 1859 at Bridell [Cardigan, March 1859, 11b 8].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 2 [RG 9/4181/59].  She was living with her parents, a scholar aged 12, in the 1871 Census [RG 10/5544/119].  She was living with her father in the 1881 Census, aged 22 [RG 11/5432/62].  She was a housekeeper, aged 28, living with her brother, John Picton, at Dowlais in the 1891 Census [RG 12/4438/143].  She was living with her brother at 77 High Street, Dowlais, in the 1901 Census, unmarried, aged 36 [RG 13/5029/16].

 

ii. JOHN PICTON, born 1861 at Penrith [Newcastle Emlyn, December 1861, 11b 17].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, a scholar aged 9 [RG 10/5544/119].  He was living with his father in the 1881 Census, aged 19 [RG 11/5432/62].  He was living at 77 High Street, Dowlais, Glamorganshire, in the 1891 Census, an ironmonger aged 27, together with his sister, Mary Picton, aged 28 [RG 12/4438/143].  John Picton was living at 77 High Street, Dowlais, in the 1901 Census, an ironmonger aged 35, born at Penrith, Pembrokeshire [RG 13/5029/16].

 

iii. JAMES PICTON, born 1865 at Penrith [Newcastle Emlyn, December 1865, 11b 15].  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 6 [RG 10/5544/119].  He was living with his father in the 1881 Census, aged 16 [RG 11/5432/62].  He could be the James Thomas Picton, living at 9 Market Street [the police station], Dowlais, Merthyr Tydfil, in the 1891 Census, a police constable, aged 24, born at Penrith, Pembrokeshire [RG 12/4438/100].  A James Picton married in 1900 to Ruth Hopes or Elizabeth Ann Weed [Pontyprydd, December 1900, 11a 1093].

 

iv. SARAH PICTON, born 1867/8 at Penrith.  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 3 [RG 10/5544/119].  She was living with her father in the 1881 Census, aged 13 [RG 11/5432/62].  Sarah Picton was living at 8 Commercial Street, Glyncorrwg, Glamorganshire, in the 1901 Census, aged 29, born at Penrith, a draper and milliner [RG 13/5060/72].  She could be the Sarah Picton who married in 1902 [Neath, March 1902, 11a 1160].

 

v. ANNA(E) PICTON, born 1871 at Penrith [Newcastle Emlyn, September 1871, 11b 17].  She was living with her father in the 1881 Census, aged 8 [RG 11/5432/62].  She was living with her father in the 1891 Census, aged 19 [RG 12/4547/116].  She was living with her sister at Glyncorrwg, Glamorganshire, in the 1901 Census, unmarried, aged 25, a draper’s assistant [RG 13/5060/72].

 

e.     MARTHA PICTON, bapt. 23 October 1825 at Tycanol, Whitechurch, aged 6 weeks.  She was not living with her parents in the 1841 Census, and was living with her elder brother, Stephen Picton, at Cynwil Elfed in the 1841 Census, aged ‘15’ [HO 107/1383/7/57].  Martha Picton married in 1848 to William Sandbrook [Cardigan, December 1848, 27 88].  William and Martha Sandbrook were living at Tygwyn Mill in the parish of Whitechurch in the 1861 Census, aged 41 and 35 respectively [RG 9/4174/51].  William and Martha Picton were living at Tygwyn Mill, Whitechurch, in the 1871 Census, aged 51 and 45 [RG 10/5539/72].  William and Martha Sandbrook were living at Tygwyn Mill, Whitechurch, in the 1881 Census, aged 62 and 57 [RG 11/5426/73].  William Sandbrook died in 1888, aged 68 [Cardigan, December 1888, 11b 1].  Martha Sandbrook, a widow, was living at Mill House, Moylgrove, in the 1891 Census, aged 62, with her daughter, Ann Thomas, a widow aged 37, and five of her children [RG 12/4544/51].  Martha Sandbrook died in 1908, aged 84 [Cardigan, December 1908, 11b 3].  William and Martha Sandbrook were the parents of:

 

i. MARY SANDBROOK, born 1849/50 at Whitechurch.  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 11 [RG 9/4174/51].

 

ii. WILLIAM SANDBROOK, born 1851/2 at Whitechurch.  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 9 [RG 9/4174/51].

 

iii. ANN(E) SANDBROOK, born 1853/4 at Whitechurch.  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 7 [RG 9/4174/51].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 18 [RG 10/5539/72].  She is probably the Anna Sandbrook who married in 1877 to David Watts Thomas [Cardigan, June 1877, 11b 22].  David Watts Thomas died in 1888, aged 38 [Cardigan, September 1888, 11b 5].

 

iv. ELIZABETH SANBROOK, born 1855/6 at Whitechurch.  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 5 [RG 9/4174/51].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 16 [RG 10/5539/72].

 

v.  THOMAS SANDBROOK, born 1857/8 at Whitechurch.  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 3 [RG 9/4174/51].

 

vi. SARAH SANDBROOK, born 1859 at Whitechurch [Cardigan, June 1859, 11b 1].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, aged 2 [RG 9/4174/51].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 12 [RG 10/5539/72].

 

vii. ANNA SANDBROOK, born 1862 at Whitechurch [Newcastle Emlyn, December 1862, 11b 19].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 10 [RG 10/5539/72].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 19 [RG 10/5426/73].

 

viii. MARTHA SANDBROOK, born 1862/3 at Whitechurch.  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 8 [RG 10/5539/72].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 17 [RG 10/5426/73].

 

ix. JOHN SANDBROOK, born 1864/5 at Whitechurch.  He was living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 6 [RG 10/5539/72].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 15 [RG 10/5426/73].

 

f.     ANNE PICTON, bapt. 18 January 1829 at Gwndwn, Bridell, aged 6 weeks.  She was living with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged 13 [HO 107/1447/1/7].  She was not living with her parents in the 1851 Census, and could be traced immediately.  An Ann Picton married in 1853 [Cardigan, September 1853, 11b 19].

 

g.    JACOB PICTON, bapt. 18 December 1831 at Bridell, aged 10 weeks.  He is not recorded as living with his parents in the 1841 Census, which suggests he was dead by that date.

 

h.    SIMON PICTON, bapt. 12 October 1833 at Gwndwn, Bridell, aged 6 weeks.  He was living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 6 [HO 107/1447/1/7].  Simon Picton died in 1841 [Cardigan, September 1841, 27 18].

 

vi.         JOHN PICTON, of Maesgwyn(ne), Whitechurch, was born in 1793 at Whitechurch.  He was on the register of the members of Penygroes Chapel, Whitechurch, in 1818 and was a deacon, treasurer and Sunday school teacher at Penygroes [E. T. Lewis, North of the Hills, 1972, p. 269].  John Picton of Ty’r bwlch was trustee to Stephen Morris of Penlan fach, Whitechurch, in his will dated 30 August 1825 and proved on 24 January 1826.  He married Hannah (Anna) Lewis on 1 December 1829 at Whitechurch [Witnesses: John Evans and Simon Evans].  He was living at Ty’r bwlch Farm, Whitechurch, in 1831 and at Maesgwyn Farm, Whitechurch, by 1850, when he was an executor of the will of his cousin, John Picton of Marianogfach, Meline.  He would appear to have taken over Maesgwyn farm from Thomas Marsden, when he emigrated to Centerville, New York State, around 1844.  John Picton was a witness to the marriage of David Morgan of Mynachlogddu and Rachel David of Meline on 23 June 1824 at Meline.  David Davies of Tyllwyd, Meline, was buried on 29 January 1828, aged 81 [check for will at NLW].

 

John Picton took over the farm at Maesgwyn from the Marsden family, and it would be interesting to know when this occurred.  However, the Marsden family must have arrived at Maesgwyn after 1786, as the Land Tax Return of that year shows the occupier of Maesgwyn to be Thomas Thomas, who also farmed Treowen.  The owner of Maesgwyn in 1786 was a widow Morgans.  Thomas Thomas was a witness to the will of Margaret Picton of Whitechurch in 1787.  John Picton was a farmer at Ty’r bwlch, aged 45, in the 1841 Census [HO 107/1448/28/5].

 

The Tithe Map for Whitechurch in the TNA, under reference IR 30/54/136 and the accompanying Schedule under IR 29/54/136, shows John Picton as the occupier of both Ty’r bwlch and Maesgwyn farms when the Schedule was made on 21 March 1839.  It would be useful to confirm all the Marsden families living at Whitechurch in 1839.  The fields listed below, together with their acreages, comprised the farm of Ty’r bwlch in the 1839 Tithe Schedule, giving a total area of just over 30 acres.  This produced an annual rent charge of £2:10s:3d.  Examination of the Tithe Map shows that Ty’r bwlch farm backed on its west side to a large extent of moorland (common) which rises up in the south to the Prescelli Hills.  The Tithe Map was surveyed at a scale of 8 chains, which is equivalent to a scale of 10 inches to 1 mile.  The Tithe Map is endorsed by Owen Lloyd, Land Surveyor, Cardigan, 1841 and signed off on 13 April 1842.  It was received and stamped by the Church Commissioners in London on 8 August 1842.  Ty’r bwlch farm adjoined Tycanol Farm, then owned by Stephen Morris and formerly by Thomas Picton, along most of its northern boundary.  John Picton was still a farmer at Maesgwyn in the 1851 Census, aged 57, the farm then comprising 64 acres and employing 3 labourers [HO 107/2481/214].  His wife, Anna Picton, was aged 42, and was born at Penrith.

 

As John Picton was a tenant farmer, any surviving records of the farm should belong with Elizabeth Bowen, as the landowner, and she needs to be identified.  A search should be made to see if Manorial Records exist for this part of Wales for this period.  James Bowen, Esq., was the owner-occupier of the mansion house at Whitechurch in 1786.  In 1839 the Misses Margaret, Elizabeth, Frances and Joyce Bowen were the owner-occupiers, with 219 acres to their name.  The last of the sisters died in 1856.  After that a clergyman, the Rev. Evan Thomas, lived at the house [Historic Houses of Pembrokeshire, p. 224].

 

TY’R BWLCH FARM, FIELD AREAS IN 1839

 

Landowner

Occupier

Schedule

Field Area, Ty’r bwlch Farm

 

 

Number

Acres

Roods

Perches

Elizabeth Bowen

John Picton

203

4

1

18

204

3

1

32

205

4

0

30

206

1

2

30

207

2

3

30

208

2

0

37

209

-

2

35

210

2

3

16

211

2

3

29

212

2

3

3

213

-

1

20

214

1

1

34

215

1

1

7

216

1

1

25

 

 

Total

30

2

6

 

By the time of the 1871 Census Ty’r bwlch farm seems to have changed entirely, and the property is recorded as occupied by David Bowen, aged 20, a shopkeeper, born at Whitechurch [RG 10/5539/74].  Was he related in any way to Elizabeth Bowen, the owner of the land in 1839?  Check for his birth entry in BMD online, and the 1861 Census.

 

The corresponding field data for Maesgwyn farm in the same Tithe Schedule are as follows.  The land of Maesgwyn farm practically encircles Penygroes Chapel, so John Picton almost could not fail to be nonconformist.

 

FIELD AREAS, MAESGWYN FARM 1839

 

Landowner

Occupier

Schedule

Field Area, Maesgwyn Farm

 

 

Number

Acres

Roods

Perches

Thomas Lloyd

John Picton

144

2

0

25

(Haverfordwest)

145

2

1

25

Lord of the Manor

146

2

1

15

147

1

1

26

148

-

3

17

149

1

2

38

150

-

1

20

151

3

1

0

152

3

0

16

153

3

2

32

154

4

0

31

155

1

2

27

156

1

1

4

157

2

1

12

158

4

2

19

159

3

2

29

160

4

1

29

161

4

3

18

162

3

3

31

163

3

2

17

164

3

3

5

165

2

1

6

166

2

2

25

 

 

Total

64

1

13

 

This area in the 1839 Tithe Map is in precise agreement with the figure given in the 1871 Census for the farm of Maesgwyn.  Maesgwyn was owned by Thomas Lloyd, who is described in the Schedule as Lord of the Manor.  Again he should be identified to see if any further records survive.  John Picton was living at Maesgwynne, Whitechurch, in the 1861 Census, aged 67, a farmer of 63 acres [RG 9/4174/47].  His wife, Hannah Picton, aged 52, born at Penrith, was living with him.  John Picton was living at Maesgwyn, Whitechurch, in the 1871 Census, aged 78, a farmer of 64 acres [RG 10/5539/72].  His wife, Anna Picton, was aged 63, born at Penrith.  John Picton died on 13 February 1875, aged 82, and was buried at Penygroes Chapel, Whitechurch [Cardigan, March 1875, 11b 2].  He left a will, which was proved by his widow, Anna Picton, the sole executrix, on 20 April 1875.  The value of his estate was under £1,000.  Hannah [Anna] Picton, his wife, died on 23 September 1879 at Maesgwyn, aged 71, and was buried at Penygroes Chapel [Cardigan, September 1879, 11b 3].  She left a will which was proved by Stephen Picton of Coedcefnlas Uchaf, farmer, the sole executor, on 24 July 1880.  The value of her estate was less than £200.  John and Hannah Picton were the parents of:

 

a.     ANNE PICTON, born January 1831 and bapt. 12 March 1831 at Penygroes Chapel, aged 6 weeks.  She was living with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged 11 [HO 107/1448/28/8].  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, aged 20, born at Whitechurch [HO 107/2481/214].  She was not in the 1861 or 1871 Census Returns for Wales.  An Anne Picton married in 1852 to Howell Evans or Philip Evans [Carmarthen, March 1852, 11a 654].

 

b.     STEPHEN PICTON, born March 1833 and bapt. 4 May 1833 at Penygroes Chapel, aged 5 weeks.  He was living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 8 [HO 107/1448/28/8].  Stephen Picton was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 18, born at Whitechurch [HO 107/2481/214].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 28 [RG 9/4174/47].  He was a farmer’s son, living with his parents in the 1871 Census, aged 38 [RG 10/5539/72].  Later Stephen Picton was a farmer, living at Coedcefnlas Uchaf, Whitechurch, in 1879.  The occupier of Coedcefnlas Ucha[f] in the 1871 Census was Louisa Griffiths, aged 36, farming 100 acres [RG 10/5536/75].  The farmer of Coed Cefnlas Isaf [sic.] in the 1839 Tithe Map of Whitechurch was Stephen Morris.  The marriage of Stephen Picton to Louisa Griffiths is recorded in 1871 [Cardigan, June 1871, 11b 14].

 

Stephen Picton was living at Coedcefnlas Ucha in the parish of Whitechurch in the 1881 Census, aged 48 [RG 11/5426/77].  He was a farmer of 87 acres, employing 2 boys.  Also living with him was his wife, Louisa Picton, aged 45, born at Cilgerran.  Stephen Picton was living at Coedcefnlas Ucha in the 1891 Census, with his wife, Louisa Picton, aged 58 and 55 respectively [RG 12/4542/133].  Louisa Picton died on 5 April 1900, aged 64, and was buried at Penygroes Chapel [Cardigan, June 1900, 11b 1].  Stephen Picton was living at Coedcefnlas Ucha in the 1901 Census, a widower and farmer, aged 68 [RG 13/5134/131].  Stephen Picton of Coedcefnlas Uchaf farm in the parish of Whitechurch died on 13 May 1914, aged 81, and was buried at Penygroes Chapel [Cardigan, June 1914, 11b ].  Probate of his estate was granted to David Davies, farmer, his son-in-law, and was valued at £2048:10s.  Stephen and Louisa Picton were the parents of:

 

i. ELIZABETH ANNA PICTON, born 1874 at Whitechurch [Cardigan, June 1874, 11b 2].  She was living with her parents in the 1881 Census, aged 6 [RG 11/5426/77].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, aged 16 [RG 12/4542/133].  She was living with her father in the 1901 Census, aged 26 [RG 13/5134/131].  Elizabeth Anna Picton married in 1903 to David Davies [Cardigan, September 1903, 11b 13].  He was the executor of his father-in-law’s estate in 1914.

 

c.     MARY PICTON, born July 1835 and bapt. 1 September 1835 at Penygroes Chapel, aged 4 weeks.  She was living with her parents in the 1841 Census, aged 5 [HO 107/1448/28/8].  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, aged 15 [HO 107/2481/214].  She died in 1858, aged 23 [Cardigan, December 1858, 11b 1] [Glyn Picton MSS, NLW].

 

d.     THOMAS PICTON, born 1839 at Whitechurch [Cardigan, March 1839, 27 47] .  He was living with his parents in the 1841 Census, aged 2 [HO 107/1448/28/8].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 12 [HO 107/2481/214].  He was buried at Penygroes Chapel on 23 June 1858, aged 19 [Cardigan, June 1858, 11b 5].

 

e.     SIMON PICTON, born 1841 at Whitechurch [Cardigan, September 1841, 27 48].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 10 [HO 107/2481/214].  He was living at Cardigan in the 1861 Census, aged 19, born at Whitechurch, an ironmonger’s assistant to Lewis James [RG 9/4175/95].  He was an accountant, living with his parents at Whitechurch in the 1871 Census, aged 29 [RG 10/5539/72].  Simon Picton married Anne George in 1877 [Cardigan, December 1877, 11b 11].  Anne and Simon Picton were visiting her father, Evan George, and his family in the 1881 Census at Baily in the parish of Llandygwydd [RG 11/5429/51].  Simon Picton was aged 39 and Anne Picton was aged 29, born at Llandygwydd.  Evan George was a farmer of 230 acres.

 

Simon Picton was living at 26 High Street, Aberdare, in the 1891 Census, a colliery clerk aged 49, together with his wife, Anne Picton, aged 39 [RG 12/4442/65].  He is recorded at 26 High Street, Aberdare, in the 1901 Census, aged 59, a colliery cashier [RG 13/5034/6].  He was living at Ivy Green, Hirwaun, Glamorganshire in 1926.  Simon Picton died in 1927, aged 86.  Simon and Anna Picton were the parents of:

 

i. THOMAS PICTON, born 1879 at Aberdare [Merthyr Tydfil, June 1879, 11a 482].  He was living with his parents in the 1881 Census, aged 2 [RG 11/5429/51] and also in 1891 Census, a scholar aged 12 [RG 12/4442/65].  He was not living with his parents in the 1901 Census and is probably the Thomas Picton, living at Cross Clarach, in the parish of Clarach, Cardiganshire, a boarder and an undergraduate, born at Hirwaun, Glamorganshire, aged 21 [RG 13/5154/12].  He was perhaps studying at The University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

 

ii. NORMAN PICTON, born 1884 at Aberdare [Merthyr Tydfil, December 1884, 11a 573].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, a scholar aged 6 [RG 12/4442/65] and in the 1901 Census, aged 16 [RG 13/5034/6].  He moved later to Ardrossan in Scotland.  Norman Picton married and was the father of:

 

a. OWAIN PICTON, born

 

b. JAMES PICTON, born

 

c. JOHN PICTON, born

 

iii. AENID PICTON, born 1888 at Aberdare [Merthyr Tydfil, March 1888, 11a 615].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, a scholar aged 3 [RG 12/4442/65].  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 13 [RG 13/5034/6].  She was a sometime Lecturer at Liverpool University, and died in 1953.

 

f.     ELIZABETH PICTON, born 1844 at Whitechurch [Cardigan, March 1844, 27 48] and she was buried at Penygroes Chapel on 21 January 1847, aged 3 [Cardigan, March 1847, 27 42] [Glyn Picton MSS, NLW].

 

g.     JOHN PICTON, born 1845 at Whitechurch [Cardigan, December 1845, 27 51].  He was living with his parents in the 1851 Census, aged 5 [HO 107/2481/214].  He was living with his parents in the 1861 Census, aged 15 [RG 9/4174/47].  He was a farmer’s son, living with his parents at Maesgwyn farm in the 1871 Census, aged 25 [RG 10/5539/72].  John Picton was a farmer at Maesgwyn(ne) farm in the 1881 Census, aged 36, born at Whitechurch, unmarried [RG 11/5426/74].  John Picton married Esther Morris in 1881 [Cardigan, December 1881, 11b 17].  John Picton was living at Maesgwynne, Whitechurch, in the 1891 Census, a farmer aged 45, together with his wife, Esther Picton, aged 40, born at Llanboidy [RG 12/4542/130].  There were no children recorded as living with them in this Census, so it would appear all three of their sons had died within a month of each other, probably of some epidemic.  John Picton was living at Whitechurch in the 1901 Census, aged 56, a farmer [RG 13/5134/133].  Also living with him was his wife, Esther Picton, aged 49, born at Llanglydwen, Carmarthenshire.  John Picton of Maesgwyn, Whitechurch, died on 10 August 1914 and was buried at Penygroes Chapel, Whitechurch, on 11 August 1914, aged 68.  Probate of his estate was granted to his widow, Esther Picton, and to his son, Elwy Picton, on 6 January 1915 and was valued at £1333:8s:4d.  His wife, Esther Picton, was buried at Penygroes Chapel, Whitechurch, on 30 March 1919, aged 67.  John and Esther Picton were the parents of:

 

i. OSWALD JOHN PICTON, born 1884 [Cardigan, March 1884, 11b 3] and he died on 18 April 1890, aged 6, and was buried at Penygroes Chapel [Cardigan, June 1890, 11b 1].

 

ii. THOMAS MORRIS PICTON, born 1885 [Cardigan, June 1885, 11b 4] and he died on 17 April 1890, aged 5, and was buried at Penygroes Chapel [Cardigan, June 1890, 11b 1].

 

iii. GWION HENRY PICTON, born 1886 [Cardigan, September 1886, 11b 1] and he died on 5 May 1890, aged 4, and was buried at Penygroes Chapel [Cardigan, June 1890, 11b 1].

 

iv. ELWY PICTON, born 1892 at Whitechurch [Cardigan, March 1892, 11b 1].  He was living with his parents in the 1901 Census, aged 9 [RG 13/5134/133].  He was joint executor of his father’s estate in 1915.  Elwy Picton, late of Maesgwyn, died on 18 August 1972, aged 80, and was buried at Penygroes Chapel.  He is probably the last Picton to have any direct association with Penygroes Chapel, Maesgwyn farm, and the parish of Whitechurch, thus ending a Picton association with the parish stretching back over at least 320 years.

 

h.     HANNAH (ANNA) PICTON, born 1849 at Whitechurch [Cardigan, September 1849, 27 44].  She was living with her parents in the 1851 Census, aged 1 year and 9 months [HO 107/2481/214].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, a scholar aged 11 [RG 9/4174/47].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 21 [RG 10/5539/72].  1881, 1891 Census.

 

i.     MARGARET PICTON, born 1852 at Whitechurch [Cardigan, June 1852, 11b 3].  She was living with her parents in the 1861 Census, a scholar aged 9 [RG 9/4174/47].  She was living with her parents in the 1871 Census, aged 18 [RG 10/5539/72].  Margaret Picton married David Rees in 1880 [Cardigan, December 1880, 11b 26].  David Rees, aged 40, a farmer of 84 acres, was living at Treclyn in the parish of Eglwyswrw with his wife, Margaret Rees, aged 28, born at Whitechurch, and two servants [RG 11/5425/38].  David Rees was living at Treclyn in the parish of Eglwyswrw in the 1891 Census, a farmer aged 49 [RG 12/4542/125].  Also living with him was his wife, Margaret Rees, aged 38, born at Whitechurch.  David Rees was living at Treclyn farm in the parish of Eglwyswrw in the 1901 Census, a farmer aged 60 [RG 13/5134/126].  Also living with him was his wife, Margaret Rees, aged 48, born at Whitechurch.  David and Margaret Rees were the parents of:

 

i. H. PICTON REES, born 1881 at Eglwyswrw [March, June or September 1881 Quarters, probably].  He was living with his parents in the 1891 Census, aged 9 [RG 12/4542/125].  He was living with his parents in the 1901 Census, a farmer’s son aged 19 [RG 13/5134/126].

 

ii. ANNA ANN REES, born 1885 at Eglwyswrw [Cardigan, June 1885, 11b 2].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, aged 6 [RG 12/4542/125].  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 15 [RG 13/5134/126].

 

iii. KEZIAH MARY REES, born 1889 at Eglwyswrw [Cardigan, September 1889, 11b 1].  She was living with her parents in the 1891 Census, aged 1 [RG 12/4542/125].  She was living with her parents in the 1901 Census, aged 11 [RG 13/5134/126].